By Ben Bowers
on 7.20.10

Whether you’re aware of it or not, there’s a growing debate in the U.S. over food. Led by writers like Michael Pollan, the so-called “Food Movement” questions America’s dietary habits and the production practices we’ve adopted to sustain them. In a similar vein, the New York Times seafood writer (yes they actually have one on staff) Paul Greenberg examines the current state of the global fishing industry and its alarming trends in Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food ($17). The four fish from the title are salmon, tuna, bass, and cod, which were chosen because of their dominating role in the global fish markets. Through examining the issues and various debates surrounding each of these species, Greenberg clearly defines the choices the world is faced with in the struggle to feed more mouths. Despite what you may think, it’s surprisingly politically neutral, and avoids ranting by simply presenting all angles of the problem in an interesting and highly educational way. Granted it’s no Robert Ludlum novel, but for those who love to fish or simply enjoy the pursuit of knowledge, we’d highly recommend it.

Buy Now: $17