Timekeeping
By Ed Estlow
on 2.4.14

Of all the brands of the Richemont luxury group to exhibit at the annual SIHH in Geneva (IWC, A. Lange and Soehne, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Cartier, Baume & Mercier and Panerai, to name a few), Greubel Forsey may be the most ambitious and experimental. Known in horological circles as masters of the tourbillon, Robert Greubel and Stephen Forsey can always be counted on to push the limits of design in the pursuit of more precise timekeeping. Their hand-wound Tourbillon GMT has been out a few years — 2011 saw its initial release in pink gold and the white gold version came out a year later — but this year it was released in weighty platinum as a truly fascinating timepiece.

The first thing to note is that the Tourbillon GMT’s case is oddly asymmetrical with various bulges making room for the universal time display globe and the tourbillon. Even the time display gets a little too close to the edge of the black chrome dial for full containment. Subdials for seconds and second time zone hour, along with the retrograde power reserve indicator, flank the main dial, giving the asymmetry some balance.

The titanium universal time globe is a detailed representation of the Northern Hemisphere as seen from above the North Pole. You guys in Sub-Saharan Africa, Patagonia, and Australia can catch a glimpse of your territory in the GMT’s side window.

The tourbillon is angled at 25 degrees and rotates every 24 seconds — just fast enough to lure your eyes away from the constant search of trying to find your house on the globe. Flip the watch over and you find a 24 time zone wheel, making the GMT a true world timer. It’s all strapped down with black alligator and a folding clasp. We break it down for you above.