Editorial & Opinion

It's a history lesson, bitches

A Front-Row Seat to Dave Chappelle’s Return

Before he took the stage at Radio City Music Hall last June, nine times to nine sold out audiences. Before his decade in seclusion. Before he walked away from a $50 million contract and onto a plane bound for South Africa. Before his two season show on Comedy Central elevated him to a demigod in social satire and racial comedy. Before Half Baked, Robin Hood: Men In Tights and performances in the Washington Square Park fountain, Dave Chappelle left high school after the bell rang and got onstage at a Tuesday night open mic. He was 14. He killed it.

A case study in the downsides of the CUV

The Bizarre Success of the BMW X6

The BMW X6 been around since 2007 and has found shockingly good sales success for BMW, even earning a refresh this year: all this, despite its inferior specs, a small interior, and the fact that it looks like it's been whacked with the same ugly stick as the Pontiac Aztek. So how does the X6 manage to draw buyers?

Chef and Co-owner of Joe Beef

30 Minutes With: David McMillan

Montreal has been good to the co-owner and co-chef of Joe Beef. But it’s the country that inspires him -- and in turn, inspires his restaurant, a relatively small place in Montreal’s Little Burgundy neighborhood that has, almost despite itself, become one of the city’s most celebrated dining spots. We recently sat down with McMillan to discuss all things Montreal, the importance of classic intentions, and drinking lots of Burgundy wine.

A vigorous argument for one of sporting's best events

For Power and Pride: The Soul of the Tour de France

In 21 days, cyclists cover the distance from Manhattan to the Las Vegas strip in the Tour de France, one of the greatest sporting events on Earth. GP contributing editor Matthew Ankeny makes a strong case for the greatness of the Tour -- and explains how the race works in the process.

It's a Table With Stuff On It...

The Desks Of Gear Patrol

Some desks at Gear Patrol are dirty, some are disorganized and some are perfectly manicured. All of them showcase at least a small part of who we are and what we're passionate about.

How to Use Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to your career's benefit

Decrypted: Making Social Media Work…for Work

Whether you’re on the hunt for a new career, thinking about striking out on your own, or simply polishing up your online resume, it’s vital to understand which social networks matter in the world of employment. It’s to your benefit to understand how networking happens in an interconnected world, where your next job is apt to come from, and how you should position yourself across a litany of different networks. Here are tips from an expert on how to use them to your benefit.

Burgeoning Seattle Chef and Restaurateur

30 Minutes With: Ethan Stowell

From catering obscurity to acclaimed chef, Seattle native Ethan Stowell is living his dream. As the chef and owner of nine Italian-inspired restaurants, a pizzeria, wine cellar and more, he's taking over this northwestern city.

Everything you need to know about using your phone on an airplane

Decrypted: Using Devices In-Flight

Phones on flights are confusing at the present moment -- especially after Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson directed the Transportation and Security Administration (TSA) to “implement enhanced security measures at certain overseas airports with direct flights to the United States" last week. In a nutshell, the new edict means that travelers taking off from abroad en route to the United States may be asked to power their carry-on phones on for inspection.

CEO of the Volvo Ocean Race

30 Minutes With: Knut Frostad

How do you popularize an obscure sporting event that runs through the remotest oceans for three quarters of a year? That is Knut Frostad’s task as CEO of the Volvo Ocean Race, a round-the-world yachting competition that takes place every two years. We sat down with Frostad in Newport, Rhode Island, which will serve as a stopover in the upcoming race, to discuss its global appeal.

Can a week of standing save you from a lifetime of sitting?

Learning to Work Standing Up

Should we all be working at stand-up desks? A GP correspondent reports on his week spent afoot.

Is there anything left to discover?

The Long Way in to Havasu Falls

Adventure travelers have an advantage that others don’t: Anyone can get on a plane and land in a remote location, but no matter how much someone talks about that place deep in the wilderness, few have what it takes to make the journey.

Facebook as Big Brother -- no surprise there

Decrypted: The Obvious Lessons of Facebook’s Mood Experiments

Congratulations to the fifteen of you who are still without a presence on Facebook -- you’ve nothing to fear. For the other billion or so folks who have chosen to generate a profile on the planet’s most notable social network, it’s probably time you paid attention to what’s really going on behind the scenes. Recently, it was revealed that Facebook conducted an experiment in 2012, whereby it intentionally (though temporarily) altered the news feeds of around 700,000 users.

The British Brand Beats the Swatch Group's Embargo in the Best Possible Way

With a New In-House Movement, Christopher Ward Sets the Bar High

Last week, while we Americans were celebrating our independence from England, English brand Christopher Ward was celebrating independence of a different sort. The ten-year-old Internet watch company announced that it had created its first in-house mechanical movement, the calibre SH21, for its new C9 Harrison 5 Day Automatic timepiece. While the watch itself is a handsome piece, fitting well into Ward’s lineup of classic sports and dress watches, it’s this movement under the hood that has the watch world buzzing.

The Prius and Future King

Where Green is Going: The Future of the Hybrid Vehicle

Today, hybrids have become a very real alternative to conventional gas-powered combustion engine cars. But it's not all flowers, Pikachu, and future decades of booming hybrid sales. The auto industry seems to have a different, more nuanced version of what the future of environmentally minded cars actually looks like. We examine.

Cycling Advocate

30 Minutes With: Paul Steely White

Being a pedestrian or a cyclist in a city can be as harrowing as it is liberating. Nobody knows that better than Paul White, executive director of Transportation Alternatives, a New York City non-profit promoting cycling, walking and public transit.

A Sandbox for Adults

Hiking the Great Sand Dunes of Colorado

Colorado's Great Sand Dunes in the San Luis Valley are the tallest dunes in America, reaching peaks of 750 feet. GP contributor Will McGough took off his shoes and played in the sand.

Fighting Free of Modern-day Tech Duncedom

Seneca vs Social Media: Dumping the Smartphone for Idle Thought

I recently started reading Seneca's Letters to a Stoic and was surprised by the content of his first letter: "Nothing, to my way of thinking, is better proof of a well ordered mind than a man's ability to stop just where he is and pass some time in his own company." This has some real clout. And it also started me worrying. Because I'm certainly not the owner of a well-ordered mind; and lately, I haven't been stopping and passing any time whatsoever in my own company. Why? At least partly because I can't stop scrolling through junk on my cell phone.

Conversations over a straight razor

30 Minutes With: Tobias Olsen

We talk to Big T, a.k.a. Tobias Olsen, owner of the beloved Royal Barbershop in Stockholm, about life's second acts, what it takes to be an excellent barber, and how to care for your skin -- and yourself.

Pool Hopping in Sweden, 26 Times

Ö Till Ö

The Ö Till Ö run/swim race in Sweden is 46 miles long. That's an impressive distance -- especially when you consider that 6 miles are in the water and the remaining 40 miles take racers over the rocky terrain of 26 islands off the coast of Stockholm.

3 Interviews, 3 Days of Music

On the Scene: The Governors Ball Music Festival

Governors Ball is a three-day music festival in New York City that draws crowds of over 40,000 each day. The culture is defined by the musicians, which range from big name headliners to up-and-coming young talent. We spoke with three young musicians to see what festival life was like on the other side of the stage.

The second time's the charm

Bentley’s New SUV Could Be a Best Seller

It's a fact: Bentley plans to release an SUV in the near future. Here's everything we currently know about the car, its effect on the brand and what it needs to be successful.

Founder of KelSo Beer Co. and Barrel-Aging Pioneer

30 Minutes With Kelly Taylor

We interview Kelly Taylor, owner and operator of KelSo Beer Co., who recently made beer history by becoming the first American brewer to age beer in Jameson's coveted whiskey barrels.

Outbound from California

5,000 Miles: Beginning a Great American Ride

Wondering what it's like to set out on a 5,000 mile bike tour of America? GP contributor Will Eginton shares his thoughts from the first leg of the trip.

An Easy to Understand, Scary Premise

Decrypted: Why the End of Net Neutrality Screws Us All

I’m not even going to use the phrase; as John Oliver so eloquently described, the mere mention of that phrase puts most people to sleep. Instead, allow me to introduce you to a tale of corruption, monopolistic business practices, and a cascading series of events that will result in ever-growing prices for Internet services such as HBO and Netflix. Oh, and that rapid pace of innovation you’re seeing in mobile app stores? Imagine a world where that doesn’t exist.

Striker on the U.S. Men's National Team

30 Minutes With: Jozy Altidore

We interview Jozy Altidore of the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team about philanthropy, the new U.S. head coach and his team of choice when playing FIFA.

Short Board to Stand Up

30 Minutes With: Slater Trout

We caught up with Slater Trout after he returned from Nicaragua, where he was competing with the U.S. team in the Stand Up Paddle Racing World Championships, to talk developing SUP as a national sport and being a force in the water.

Hot, primordial ooze

Hiking in Hawaii’s Lava Fields

One of the most diverse islands on the planet, Hawaii Island plays host to all but two of the world’s ecosystems, including active volcanoes. GP contributor Will McGough summits Kilauea Crater for a firsthand look inside the Devil’s Kitchen.

Why 3D Ruined The World Cup Experience For Everyone

Decrypted: The World Cup’s 4K Tragedy

In 2010 ESPN banked big on 3D as the new way to watch the World Cup. It didn't work out well. Now the most notable advancement in high-definition television, 4K, is being left out of coverage of 2014's tournament -- and it's a damn shame.

Gravel Racing Pioneer

30 Minutes With: Rebecca Rusch

Rebecca Rusch quit her day job to pursue her love of competition. It worked out, and today she's a professional cyclist with sponsors like Red Bull and Specialized.

Third-Party Extensibility Thrives in iOS 8

Decrypted: Apple Drops its Guard

Make no mistake: what we’re witnessing right now is the beginning of a new Apple. The company that showed itself during the WWDC 2014 keynote is dramatically different from the Apple of years past, a company that had maintained a legendary wall around its wares, demanding that users either do things their way or go elsewhere. And if I had to guess, I’d wager that most of you reading this stand to benefit yesterday's shift.

The Watch as A lesson

Father, Time

Unlike many family traditions, including those shown in Patek Philippe ads, in our family, watch gifts didn’t flow from father to son but rather the other way around.

When more is way too much

The Business of Busyness

Nissan's third generation Murano bowed at the New York Auto Show this spring. The reason you didn't see it in our Ten Best list from the show is because I hate it the way my architect wife hates attached garages and vinyl siding. Car design is trending toward overbearing, thanks in no small part to the tastes of drivers. But there's still hope out there.

Menswear Influencer

30 Minutes With: Jeff Carvalho

First impressions go a long way in this world, and Jeff Carvalho knows it. The 39-year-old cofounder of the men's style and lifestyle site Selectism presents himself like a real-life version of Robert Downey Jr's Tony Stark: intelligent, well-dressed, confident. People listen when he talks. Or maybe they listen because he tells great stories. Or because he's the kind of guy that can go out for a night of karaoke and wind up sitting in Big Boi's living room.

Case in Point

Why the Watch Case Matters

Most discussions about watches and their value begin and end with the movement: Swiss versus Japanese, in-house versus outsourced, finishing and complications. But in reality, the movement is only part of the story. All too often overlooked is the humble watch case, which can be equally artful, interesting, and difficult to produce.

bat dogs, biscuits, and $3 beers...sign us up

Minor League Baseball: The King of Summer Sports

If you’re looking for something to do on a Friday night this summer, put down the craft cocktails and go take in the American Pastime at its absolute best.

Goodbye, Net Neutrality

Decrypted: What AT&T’s $42.5 Billion Dollar Purchase Means For You

Just over 30 years ago, the U.S. Department of Justice mandated the breakup of the Bell System in order to prevent AT&T from essentially gaining control over all of America’s telephony services. Later this year, AT&T will likely be allowed to join hands with the largest satellite television provider in the United States. As they say, what goes around usually comes around.