Editorial & Opinion

Common Sense, the better part of Valor

G-Force and Terror On an Air Racing Ride Along

Already strapped in, with a stranger tightening my parachute, it becomes jarringly clear Red Bull race planes don’t have ejection seats. “In the event of an emergency, the canopy flies open, and I’ll be yelling ‘Bail! Bail! Bail!’” instructs François Le Vot, my French aerobatic pilot.

Red Bull Air Race Champion

30 Minutes With: Nigel Lamb

In the world's fastest motorsport, pilots fly at 230 mph and pull upwards of 10 g's through the track. GP sat down with Nigel Lamb, Breitling's Master Class pilot, ahead of the Red Bull Air Race at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway.

Pumping new life into a storied brand

Automotive Passion Saves TVR Again — Will it Be Enough?

British automaker TVR is known for some of the most radical cars in the world, but they've faced serious problems since their creation in 1947. Now, the brand's cult supporters have hope again. But will new leadership and a commitment to quality cars be enough?

Big Mountain Freeriding Disciple

30 Minutes With: Nicolas Müller

Nicolas Müller is one of the best snowboarders on the planet, but you won’t see him on the podium at the X Games or in highlight clips on SportsCenter. The 32-year-old Swiss native started out as a competitive snowboarder, eventually reaching the top of the international circuit, but hung it all up to push the progression on the sport on bigger canvas: big mountain free riding.

23-Year-Old Cyclocross Champion

30 Minutes With: Lars Van der Haar

Slight at 5’7” and 128 pounds, Dutch cyclocross star Lars van der Haar, 23, wields heavyweight power at the races. He rides with a style so explosive that it inspired American cyclocross fans to coin the phrase "Go van der Haarder". Like Belgian Sven Nys before him (#svenness), van der Haar has transcended the bounds of the sport and stands perched on the cusp of becoming a legend.

It's Time for a Mischief Night in Craft Beer

The Pumpkin Beer Problem

Back in 2011 The Atlantic reported on "The Divisive Pumpkin Ale", alleging that the style had become synonymous with increasingly stale and overdone flavors. This is still the (very subjective) argument for people who loathe the stuff. But more and more brewers and beer enthusiasts argue beyond taste: they say that some pumpkin beer practices are bad for consumers and craft beer in general.

To Glashütte, with Love

A Lange-Term Love Affair

I’ll never own a Lange & Söhne timepiece. Yet ask me what my favorite watch brand is and I’ll spit out their name without hesitation. Here's why.

The Real Ironman

30 Minutes With: Craig Alexander

Craig Alexander is one of the greats in triathlon. He was kind enough to join us for a jog in Central Park, where we talked food, training and one of the great scandals in Ironman history.

Eating Like His Ancestors

Gone Paleo: 21 Days in the Cave

Matthew Ankeny set out for three weeks of fad-dieting to see if the wave of hype surrounding the latest favorite American diet could hold weight. How did he feel after 21 days of eating just fresh fish, vegetables, fruit and nuts (plus a demonic juice binge)?

Another Way to Get a Bogey

This Is Footgolf

Footgolf rose out of the zeitgeist of man’s two primary proclivities -- to turn everything into a competition and to kick things. With low start-up costs and high revenue yield, the sport may be golf’s golden goal.

The Age of Innocence Editor Reuel Golden Talks About His Latest Book

A Look Back at Soccer’s Golden Age

The Age of Innocence: Football in the 1970s is a photographic eulogy for the first era of worldwide soccer obsession, documenting the lives of international legends -- Pelé, Franz Beckenbauer, Bobby Moore, Maradona, Johan Cruyff and more -- on and off the pitch. We spoke with Reuel Golden, the book's editor, about soccer's golden age.

Switzerland is not in trouble

Bring it, Apple Watch: The Traditional Watch Is Here to Stay

“Switzerland is in trouble", Jony Ive recently said when introducing Apple's smart watch. But watch collectors have heard those words before, and the traditional wristwatch has survived -- prospered even. Which is partly why non-smart watches still have nothing to fear.

Snip Snip

Decrypted: Should You Cut the Cord on Cable?

More Americans now subscribe to in-home broadband than cable television from any of the nation's nine largest providers. We’re arguably staring at a future where all content -- channel based or otherwise -- is delivered over the Internet.

Advice from My Second Time Around

How to Run a Faster Marathon

Sequels tend to suck (Caddyshack II, I’m looking at you), and when they’ve got 26.2 miles of pavement in them, the suck-potential goes exponentially up. After my second marathon, I came up with some advice to my former self, who was still prepping for his first. You can listen in.

Something's askew in the world of crash testing

Heavier Car? For Safety, That’s a Good Thing

It's both conventional wisdom and fact that heavier cars tend to be safer for their drivers and passengers in crashes. But when it comes to crash test ratings that are widely recognized in the automotive industry and consumers, weight is not brought into the equation with the heft it deserves.

Founders of Left Hand Brewing and Rogue Ales

30 Minutes With: Eric Wallace and Brett Joyce

We sit down with Eric Wallace of Left Hand Brewing and Brett Joyce of Rogue Ales to talk about brewing technology, stout glasses and Miley Cyrus.

5-time Kiteboarding World Champ

30 Minutes With: Aaron Hadlow

By the age of 20, professional kiteboarder Aaron Hadlow won the PKRA World Tour 5 times. Nobody was on his level -- but that was in 2008. Now the sport's most decorated athlete has returned. We talked to him about the future of kiteboarding and how he could’ve been balling next to Wayne Rooney.

British author and adventurer

30 Minutes With: Alastair Humphreys

Alastair Humphreys has bicycled around the world; embarked on polar expeditions; completed a self-supported, thousand-mile walk through the Empty Quarter Desert; rowed the Atlantic; crossed India coast-to-coast on foot and backpacked and packrafted across Iceland, among other expeditions. This is a man who knows a thing or two about adventure.

High-Class Elbow Grease

The Human Engine of the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

The 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance is a six-day automotive smörgåsbord on the bucolic greens of the Monterey Peninsula. We sent our non-car enthusiast editor, Matthew Ankeny, to see the scene, hear the stories, and relay the results.

The slow creep of one wine collector's addiction

More Mature With Age

I come from a family of beer drinkers, firmly rooted in the blue-collar heritage of my grandfather’s construction and carpentry business. My father likes to say that it was his own skill at unskilled labor that paid his way through college. He whole-heartedly embraced the craft beer movement. My brothers share his taste for the malt, but my passion has been for wine.

Looking for gold at the Leadville Trail 100 MTB

Racing Across the Sky in Colorado

Leadville, CO, is the highest incorporated city in the United States. GP contributor Peter Koch went there for a 100-mile mountain bike race.

It's a history lesson, bitches

A Front-Row Seat to Dave Chappelle’s Return

Before he took the stage at Radio City Music Hall last June, nine times to nine sold out audiences. Before his decade in seclusion. Before he walked away from a $50 million contract and onto a plane bound for South Africa. Before his two season show on Comedy Central elevated him to a demigod in social satire and racial comedy. Before Half Baked, Robin Hood: Men In Tights and performances in the Washington Square Park fountain, Dave Chappelle left high school after the bell rang and got onstage at a Tuesday night open mic. He was 14. He killed it.

A case study in the downsides of the CUV

The Bizarre Success of the BMW X6

The BMW X6 been around since 2007 and has found shockingly good sales success for BMW, even earning a refresh this year: all this, despite its inferior specs, a small interior, and the fact that it looks like it's been whacked with the same ugly stick as the Pontiac Aztek. So how does the X6 manage to draw buyers?

Chef and Co-owner of Joe Beef

30 Minutes With: David McMillan

Montreal has been good to the co-owner and co-chef of Joe Beef. But it’s the country that inspires him -- and in turn, inspires his restaurant, a relatively small place in Montreal’s Little Burgundy neighborhood that has, almost despite itself, become one of the city’s most celebrated dining spots. We recently sat down with McMillan to discuss all things Montreal, the importance of classic intentions, and drinking lots of Burgundy wine.

A vigorous argument for one of sporting's best events

For Power and Pride: The Soul of the Tour de France

In 21 days, cyclists cover the distance from Manhattan to the Las Vegas strip in the Tour de France, one of the greatest sporting events on Earth. GP contributing editor Matthew Ankeny makes a strong case for the greatness of the Tour -- and explains how the race works in the process.

How to Use Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to your career's benefit

Decrypted: Making Social Media Work…for Work

Whether you’re on the hunt for a new career, thinking about striking out on your own, or simply polishing up your online resume, it’s vital to understand which social networks matter in the world of employment. It’s to your benefit to understand how networking happens in an interconnected world, where your next job is apt to come from, and how you should position yourself across a litany of different networks. Here are tips from an expert on how to use them to your benefit.

Burgeoning Seattle Chef and Restaurateur

30 Minutes With: Ethan Stowell

From catering obscurity to acclaimed chef, Seattle native Ethan Stowell is living his dream. As the chef and owner of nine Italian-inspired restaurants, a pizzeria, wine cellar and more, he's taking over this northwestern city.

Everything you need to know about using your phone on an airplane

Decrypted: Using Devices In-Flight

Phones on flights are confusing at the present moment -- especially after Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson directed the Transportation and Security Administration (TSA) to “implement enhanced security measures at certain overseas airports with direct flights to the United States" last week. In a nutshell, the new edict means that travelers taking off from abroad en route to the United States may be asked to power their carry-on phones on for inspection.

CEO of the Volvo Ocean Race

30 Minutes With: Knut Frostad

How do you popularize an obscure sporting event that runs through the remotest oceans for three quarters of a year? That is Knut Frostad’s task as CEO of the Volvo Ocean Race, a round-the-world yachting competition that takes place every two years. We sat down with Frostad in Newport, Rhode Island, which will serve as a stopover in the upcoming race, to discuss its global appeal.

Can a week of standing save you from a lifetime of sitting?

Learning to Work Standing Up

Should we all be working at stand-up desks? A GP correspondent reports on his week spent afoot.

Is there anything left to discover?

The Long Way in to Havasu Falls

Adventure travelers have an advantage that others don’t: Anyone can get on a plane and land in a remote location, but no matter how much someone talks about that place deep in the wilderness, few have what it takes to make the journey.

Facebook as Big Brother -- no surprise there

Decrypted: The Obvious Lessons of Facebook’s Mood Experiments

Congratulations to the fifteen of you who are still without a presence on Facebook -- you’ve nothing to fear. For the other billion or so folks who have chosen to generate a profile on the planet’s most notable social network, it’s probably time you paid attention to what’s really going on behind the scenes. Recently, it was revealed that Facebook conducted an experiment in 2012, whereby it intentionally (though temporarily) altered the news feeds of around 700,000 users.

The British Brand Beats the Swatch Group's Embargo in the Best Possible Way

With a New In-House Movement, Christopher Ward Sets the Bar High

Last week, while we Americans were celebrating our independence from England, English brand Christopher Ward was celebrating independence of a different sort. The ten-year-old Internet watch company announced that it had created its first in-house mechanical movement, the calibre SH21, for its new C9 Harrison 5 Day Automatic timepiece. While the watch itself is a handsome piece, fitting well into Ward’s lineup of classic sports and dress watches, it’s this movement under the hood that has the watch world buzzing.

The Prius and Future King

Where Green is Going: The Future of the Hybrid Vehicle

Today, hybrids have become a very real alternative to conventional gas-powered combustion engine cars. But it's not all flowers, Pikachu, and future decades of booming hybrid sales. The auto industry seems to have a different, more nuanced version of what the future of environmentally minded cars actually looks like. We examine.

Cycling Advocate

30 Minutes With: Paul Steely White

Being a pedestrian or a cyclist in a city can be as harrowing as it is liberating. Nobody knows that better than Paul White, executive director of Transportation Alternatives, a New York City non-profit promoting cycling, walking and public transit.