Features

Fishing Sea to Shining Sea

The Complete Guide to Fishing Eight American Cities

Fishing is a lot of things to a lot of people, but one thing it's not is easily defined. Excluded from the latest definition, whose authors subscribed a little too obsessively to A River Runs Through It, is "ugly" fishing: the lines dropped from rocky piers, the lures twanged off bridge abutments, picking through the empty parking lot out behind Sears to get to the water. Modernity hasn't left fisherman many beautiful spots, but damn if that's gonna stop us. These eight cities prove that you can get away within the city limits, and that some of the best fishing in the country doesn't depend on a distant locale.

Lure Lore

The Art of the Fishing Lure

Fishermen have long known that fish are often smarter than they. But the rest of us probably haven't given the lures used to catch these clever, wary creatures their due. In fact, the best lures are really works of inventiveness, science, utility and even art.

From Tinkerer to Timekeeper

Talking Shop with Leo Padron, a New American Watchmaker

Leo Padron grew up a tinkerer, then turned his focus to fixing his grandfather's broken wristwatch. He succeeded...and then he started building his own. We talked to Padron, who today helms Padron Watch Co., a successful startup building three unique watches out of Minneapolis.

The Theater of Motorsport

Scuderia 120

There's a particular theater to motorsport. The hair-bristling caterwaul of a race exhaust. The aromas of hot metal mechanics. The gritty dust of tire soot. And that's for spectators. Step beyond the yellow line into pit row and things get far more visceral. And though we could prattle on in paragraphs about what it's like to be face-to-face with theatrics of racing Ferraris, we figured it best to report this story through the medium of film.

Lessons Through Tasting with the Experts

Saving the Extra Virgins: Olive Oil Made Right

True extra virgin olive oil is not always what you buy at the supermarket. Matthew Ankeny tours the Long Meadow Ranch to experience olive oil made by a passionate, knowledgeable group of California-based olive millers.

BRITISH WATCHMAKING, WITH NARY A GLANCE AT THE SWISS

Robert Loomes: Bringing Watchmaking Back to the British Isles

Robert Loomes & Co., makes gorgeous watches in small, limited editions of 50 or 100 pieces. He joins the growing cadre of watchmakers who are pushing British watchmaking as far as possible, along with Christopher Ward, Roger Smith, and the brothers English.

It's a history lesson, bitches

A Front-Row Seat to Dave Chappelle’s Return

Before he took the stage at Radio City Music Hall last June, nine times to nine sold out audiences. Before his decade in seclusion. Before he walked away from a $50 million contract and onto a plane bound for South Africa. Before his two season show on Comedy Central elevated him to a demigod in social satire and racial comedy. Before Half Baked, Robin Hood: Men In Tights and performances in the Washington Square Park fountain, Dave Chappelle left high school after the bell rang and got onstage at a Tuesday night open mic. He was 14. He killed it.

Expect the Unexpected

Photo Essay: Traveling the Amazon by Riverboat

In much of the Amazon, traveling by riverboat is the best form of transportation. So we set off from Iquitos, Peru, fondly dubbed the Capital of the Peruvian Amazon, aboard the Aqua Aria, a luxurious river boat that would take us roughly 100 miles up and down the Amazon River.

The weird vehicles that started it all

CUV DNA: The Original Crossovers

While the marketing term "crossover" is a recent invention, the concept is not. Automakers have been making cars that fill the gap between utility vehicles and family cars for decades. Here are three that helped to determine what the crossover is today, along with their modern-day kindred spirits.

Hint: it involves flying fish roe

Montreal Meets New York, in a Bagel Shop

We get three bagel sandwich recipes from Black Seed Bagels in NYC, where they combine New York and Montreal styles to build the king of donut-shaped foods.

Two Biologists teach Montreal how good craft brews can be

Dieu du Ciel and the Science of Good Beer

A little over two decades ago, Stephane Ostiguy and Jean-Francois Gravel met while studying science at McGill University. Neither got their degrees -- but they do make some of the best beer in the world at Dieu du Ciel, Montreal's best craft brewery.

Storming the East Coast's best surf town

48 Hours of Sun and Swell in Montauk

When we invited Forest Woodward, one of our favorite photographers, to Montauk for the weekend, we had no idea we’d be graced with the best waves we’ve seen in years.

It's a Table With Stuff On It...

The Desks Of Gear Patrol

Some desks at Gear Patrol are dirty, some are disorganized and some are perfectly manicured. All of them showcase at least a small part of who we are and what we're passionate about.

Some MMasterful, All MMagnificent

The BMW M3 Through the Generations

Over the decades, BMW's iconic M3 has only grown in power, performance (and in most cases, weight), going from niche sports sedans to one of the most popular performance-focused automobiles in the industry. The best part? There are five generations of them, all with scintillating, unique details and the underlying similarities of greatness.

Home cooking gets an upgrade

Inside the New American Supper Club

Underground supper clubs, where strangers eat home-cooked meals made by professional chefs, are spreading throughout America. Gear Patrol sat down at one in Brooklyn, New York to see firsthand where the trend's headed.

Once Left for dead, a five-time Ironman winner returns to form

Jordan Rapp: Another Day at the Office

Pro triathlete Jordan Rapp is a poster boy for endurance -- and not just because he’s won five Ironmans, two Leadman Epic 250s and the 2011 ITU Long Distance World Championships. The more remarkable feat is that all but two of those victories came following a near-fatal hit-and-run accident.

The Hillclimb is alive with the sound of motors

The Goodwood Festival of Speed

The Goodwood Festival of Speed is more than just a motoring event. It's the product of one man's passion for all things automotive, fueled by hundreds of thousands of the worshiping faithful. Lord March, as Charles Gordon-Lennox is called, took possession of the 12,000-acre Goodwood Estate in 1993 and almost immediately started the Festival in the name of bringing racing back to its traditional home in West Sussex. He's effectively created a playground for both the annual event's spectators and its drivers.

Can a week of standing save you from a lifetime of sitting?

Learning to Work Standing Up

Should we all be working at stand-up desks? A GP correspondent reports on his week spent afoot.

Is there anything left to discover?

The Long Way in to Havasu Falls

Adventure travelers have an advantage that others don’t: Anyone can get on a plane and land in a remote location, but no matter how much someone talks about that place deep in the wilderness, few have what it takes to make the journey.

From World Cup Ashes

The Rise of the European Soccer Fan in America

The United States Men’s National Soccer Team (#USMNT) was knocked out of the World Cup by Belgium in the Round of 16, but you already know this. You watched it. More people streamed the U.S.'s third World Cup match versus Germany -- which kicked off on a Wednesday afternoon -- than this year's Super Bowl. Their previous game versus Portugal was the most watched U.S. soccer game ever. Basically, if your television wasn't showing footy, you were either kidnapped or not a sports fan. But here’s the deal: the World Cup is an aberration. Soccer fans aren’t privileged to such an event every other month. It’s every fours years. After the final on July 13, players will travel back to their respective clubs (a “club” refers to a team and its organization), but what’ll we -- the masses of newly converted football fans, spoiled by perpetual matches -- do? Do we fall back under the veil of American ignorance, pretending it's a second-tier sport? No. Watch the MLS? Not just yet. Instead, we'll follow the world’s best players back to Europe. Here are the basics, and how to watch.

On the 'cue trail in Texas

The Lone Star Smokeshow: 6 Must-Eats on the Texas BBQ Trail

Texas is home to the original cowboys, the gunslingers and trailblazers. They pushed 20 million head of cattle through Dustbowl territory during the historic cattle drives. Beef is in their blood. And their barbecue is the best there is. We sought out the legendary joints in the heart of the Lone Star state.

5 Courses, 1 Grill, No Dishes

Master the One-Grill Meal

The life of a dinner shindig can be as simple as quality charcoal, a few tunes and some great beef. Oh, and good beer. The "One Grill Meal" isn't a challenging culinary proposition. In fact, outside of skillet cooking it's about as simple of a trick as they come. And whether your have propane or charcoal it's a pretty damn simple affair and about as American as it gets.

2,200 years of making shit go boom

A Quick, Flashy History of Fireworks

From bamboo shoots to Mongolian invasions to the Renaissance to Independence Day, we break down the complete history of fireworks and why we use them for the Fourth of July.

A Sandbox for Adults

Hiking the Great Sand Dunes of Colorado

Colorado's Great Sand Dunes in the San Luis Valley are the tallest dunes in America, reaching peaks of 750 feet. GP contributor Will McGough took off his shoes and played in the sand.

Polishing the star

A Visit to the Mercedes-Benz Classics Center

From the Archives: Vintage has gained traction in recent years, arguably as a reaction to our digital, disposable age. This rediscovered appreciation for beautiful, meaningful objects from our past is exactly why the Mercedes-Benz Classics Center in Irvine, CA exists...that, and to bring back to life those cars which cause us to lust from the deepest parts of our soft, chewy automotive centers.

Flatiron, 10:45 p.m.

Late Plates: Michael Somoroff

For our latest edition of Late Plates, GP's Jeremy Berger met up with commercial director, fine artist, classic car collector and philosopher Michael Somoroff at the emporium of Italian foods and fine dining in New York, Eataly, for a plate of pasta and an education in living a fulfilling life.

Fundamental techniques for grilling

Grilling Basics from The Meat Hook Butcher Shop

Whether you have a cheaper grill or a top-dollar wood-fired jam, one thing should be made clear: grills don’t cook steaks by themselves. Tom Mylan, owner of The Meat Hook in Brooklyn, NY, explains in this excerpt from his book.

Pool Hopping in Sweden, 26 Times

Ö Till Ö

The Ö Till Ö run/swim race in Sweden is 46 miles long. That's an impressive distance -- especially when you consider that 6 miles are in the water and the remaining 40 miles take racers over the rocky terrain of 26 islands off the coast of Stockholm.

3 Interviews, 3 Days of Music

On the Scene: The Governors Ball Music Festival

Governors Ball is a three-day music festival in New York City that draws crowds of over 40,000 each day. The culture is defined by the musicians, which range from big name headliners to up-and-coming young talent. We spoke with three young musicians to see what festival life was like on the other side of the stage.

One Breath, One Dive

Learning to Freedive with One of the World’s Best

Most of the people who come to Bonaire are SCUBA divers, hauling heavy bags of gear -- buoyancy vests and regulators. But on this visit, I decided to try something different: freediving. No tanks, just a breath of air. I wanted to experience the transcendent silence and freedom freedivers talk about. The best man to learn from is in Bonaire, and I was about to get a one-on-one lesson from him.

The World Without Sun

The Age of Aquarius: Diving Down to Fabien Cousteau’s Mission 31

I had been warned to keep my depth above 50 feet to maximize bottom time, and as I slipped under the “porch” of Aquarius, I saw my computer read 48 feet. I popped up inside the moon pool, removed my regulator and mask and took a breath of the pressurized air inside. “Welcome to Aquarius”, Fabien Cousteau said with a smile as he stood above me in the wet room.

Utter Beauty and Supreme Brawn

Film: Proving the Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4 at Ascari

The four fat rubber circles that attach both you and the Huracán to the road were chosen to be worked very, very hard. So were the 601 horses that shriek from its 5.2-liter V10 power plant. There's an extra incentive behind each of these Italian supercar's facets: it's not enough for this car to move like Usain Bolt or look like Elisabetta Canalis. The Huracán is Sant'Agata's replacement for the monumentally successful Gallardo (huge shoes to fill) and frankly, it makes its predecessor seem rough and antiquated -- even a bit homely. The mechanical shaming of the Gallarod tells you just about everything you need to know about the Huracán. It's next-generation Lamborghini.

A Dish Best Served Al Denté

Carbo Load: A Visual Pasta Primer

Know Your Foods is a new culinary crash course on various foods and ingredients -- and if we’ve done our job right, also an inspirational kick in the ribs to expand your dining horizons. Use it for your next meal. Use it impress a girl. Use them to land a job or to silence a patronizing maître d'. But for the love of garlic, use it somewhere. First up, that delicious, carbo-loaded ingredient: pasta.

Hot, primordial ooze

Hiking in Hawaii’s Lava Fields

One of the most diverse islands on the planet, Hawaii Island plays host to all but two of the world’s ecosystems, including active volcanoes. GP contributor Will McGough summits Kilauea Crater for a firsthand look inside the Devil’s Kitchen.

First, third or last: Italy always wins

Gran Premio d’Italia

The Autodromo Internazionale del Mugello, a 3.25 mile serpent of asphalt nestled within the Tuscan Appenine Mountains just north of Florence, plays host every year to the Gran Premio d’Italia MotoGP race -- the home race for Ducati Corse. With only one world championship to its name (2007) and zero dry-weather victories during the 2013 season, the Ducati Team had the eyes of a nation following its every move this past weekend at the fastest track on the calendar.

No need for directions

Afar with Dad: Father-Son Adventures

Dad's transitioned from a guardian to a friend, and your Father's Day gift should reflect that. He deserves more than a hastily wrapped tie and some tee time vouchers. It's time to go on an adventure together, and these three are plenty out of the ordinary but don't require a year's worth of planning (or salary).

Drowning in Beer

On the Scene: The American Craft Beer Festival

Only in its seventh year, the American Craft Beer Festival is already the largest beer festival on the East Coast. Unlike the West Coast-dominated Great American Beer Festival, the American Craft Beer Festival isn’t a competition; brewers aren’t asked to pay for their booth space, and they are reimbursed for the beer they serve at the festival. This allows more smaller breweries to attend, and it also makes the festival something of a celebration of beer for beer’s sake.

June 6, 1944

Remembering D-Day: “The Horrible Waste of War” by Ernie Pyle

Editor's Note: Today marks the 70th year since the invasion of Normandy by Allied troops, the largest seaborne invasion in history in the largest war in history. It was just after the massive beachhead invasion of Operation Overlord had grabbed a toehold on the coast of France that war correspondent Ernie Pyle walked along the shoreline of one landing beach and looked out on what the invasion had left in its wake. This became the subject of his short piece, "The Horrible Waste of War", published on June 16, 1944.

Be handy, man

The Basics of Bike Maintenance

In this how-to we review the basics of bike maintenance: how to fix a flat, how to adjust shifting and how to clean your bike chain.

The Watch as A lesson

Father, Time

Unlike many family traditions, including those shown in Patek Philippe ads, in our family, watch gifts didn’t flow from father to son but rather the other way around.

Dads, Look No Further

80 Perfect Gifts for Father’s Day

Your padre taught you (almost) everything about life you couldn't learn from the classroom or the cache of treasures stashed under your older brother's bed. Through his actions, you gleaned the proper way to conduct yourself in a crowd and how not to putt. Deciphering the method to his madness is now clear with the wisdom of hindsight. It is, and always was, about tracing his footsteps while avoiding his detours. This father's day, prove he's taught you well and solidify your position as the favored son by giving him something to help him improve on one of the many facets of his already impressive game. Here are 80 excellent suggestions.