Logic Need Not Apply

God Bless the Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat

225 kilometers an hour? It’s 0.62, right? Why the hell can’t I figure it into miles? So 124 plus like 14 or 16 or...shit-shit-shit time to brake. Turns out mental math is a lot more difficult when solved howling down the main straight at Summit Point Motorsports Park in the most powerful sedan ever made.

Steel frames, gravel roads and good wine? Per favore.

Photo Essay: Classic Bikes and Tuscan Vistas at L’Eroica

The scenery is just one of the things that’s made L’Eroica one of the greatest organized rides in the world since Giancarlo Brocci founded it 30 years ago to help preserve the strada bianche, or white sand and gravel roads of Tuscany.

Home in the Heavens

A Cabin in the Skies

Tantalus Hut has no power or running water. But by backcountry standards, it's still a luxurious pad. Situated in the Tantalus Range of British Columbia, the hut is an ideal base camp for the adventurous and daring who want to take aim at mountain peaks.

Seeking The Gods' Delight Above Tantalus

Hiking the Sky of British Columbia

As far as recreation goes, heli-hiking is expensive. But it's also a means for everyday folk to access remote, sometimes impossible-to-reach parts of the world -- like the peaks of the Tantalus Range in British Columbia -- in a four-minute helicopter ride, instead of a four-day slog. It's only when you see the other side of the ridge that you realize you'd never tasted a wild berry or truly seen the color blue (reserved only for the types of lakes hidden in the mountains).

A Study in the Finer Points of Drinking

The Perfect Bar Cart

Alcohol remains an enduring motif in the great American narrative. That’s probably because those that wrote it drank, and drank well — epitomized by the enduring symbol of the most sophisticated of drinking cultures: the bar cart. What follows is just one interpretation of how the home bar should look and taste. Like with all things great, a great bar cart is a long term investment and requires time to develop. It’s not necessary to stock everything; ours is listed simply to help guide those starting from scratch in the finer points of home drinking. Click, learn and imbibe well.

Read Them and Eat

The 25 Best Restaurants in America

This year, like last year, we did our fair share of dining. We hunted for barbecue in Texas, ate all the burgers in L.A. and went inside the new American supper club. We found that, like television, restaurants are in the best form they’ve ever been. These are 25 of our favorite restaurants in America, chosen by our editors and writers across the country for their newness, their hospitality and the quality of their food — though not always in that order.

An e-bike with a brain

The Bicycle Wheel, Reinvented

With the highly anticipated Copenhagen Wheel, from MIT-born Superpedestrian seeks to improve urban biking. In an increasingly crowded e-bike market, it might be the most successful attempt so far.

The Everest of Sailing

The Boats, Crew and Route of the Around-the-World Volvo Ocean Race

In the past decade, the Volvo Ocean Race has seen boats dismasted and sunk, sailors break bones and lose teeth -- and in one tragedy, a Dutch crew member washed overboard and was killed. It’s no wonder the race is called the “Everest of sailing”. Here's a primer on the latest edition Volvo Ocean Race, beginning October 11, 2014.

Northern Roads Afar

1,000 Miles of British Columbia on Two Wheels

A fork in the road. Rarely in life does the metaphorical appear in such literal form. Yet there it was, and there we were. Twelve dust-covered motorcyclists on a journey through British Columbia’s beautiful northern interior, faced squarely with two paths and three options: left, right or turn around. This is where the riding stopped and the adventure began.

Pain and Pleasure

Cycling California Wine Country with a Local Pro

Levi Leipheimer is a diviner of pain and suffering par excellence -- a bike race organizer. We asked him to cull his dark arts and assemble 10 rides in the scenic, relaxing and overall pleasant area that is Northern California's wine country. Enjoy responsibly.

Four Generations of the Mazda MX-5 Miata

The Evolution of the Mazda MX-5 Miata

It's said that driving a slow car fast is one of the greatest automotive thrills, especially when it's a lightweight, rear-wheel-drive roadster with a rigid chassis, slick manual transmission, phenomenal balance and perfectly-weighted steering -- a car like the Mazda Miata. With the latest generation just released, it's about time we explored the past, present and future of the world's most popular roadster.

Let's Get Cookin'

The Complete Guide to Camp Stoves

The best way to decide which stove you need is not by referring to a standard “best of” list, but instead considering where you fit in amid a wide range of stoves designed with specific types of campers and trips in mind. The best stove for brewing a cup of coffee won’t be the same one you bring on a road trip to Yellowstone to feed a family of four. The ideal, one-size-fits-all camp stove is still far off, so consider your own specific flame-based needs and parse our guide.

The history and fundamentals of a burgeoning extreme sport

Primer: The Winds and Waves of Kiteboarding

Sailors rely on wind. Surfers need waves. The best kiteboarders require both. We've put together a beginner's guide to the exciting, fast-growing sport.

Long Rifle of the Air Age

The 60-Year History of the B-52 Stratofortress

When General Nathan Twining, chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force from 1953 to 1957, called the Boeing B-52 “the long rifle of the air age” shortly after it entered service on June 29, 1955, no one imagined that the eight-engine, 390,000-pound bomber would still be operational 60 years later.

Your checklist for a beefy LA lunch

On the Burger Trail in Los Angeles

The city of Los Angeles is known for Hollywood stars, sprawling traffic...and gourmet burgers. Yes, that sandwich concoction that first appeared in the late 1800s has become a staple in the City of Angels. There are the obvious picks like Umami, Father's Office, Apple Pan and of course In-N-Out; but a quick Yelp search for "burger" reveals almost 6,000 places to sit and enjoy ground meat on a bun. We spent a week seeking some of the lesser known but equally (arguably more) loved options.

How the West was won

Cycling Skyward: Conquering the West’s Toughest Climbs

One month after he set out from King's Beach, CA, on a 5,000-mile bike tour of America, GP contributor Will Eginton stood on top of the Continental Divide at Logan Pass in Glacier National Park and reflected on the mountains he'd climbed.

Father of the modern SUV, for better or worse

The History of the Jeep Wagoneer, the First Sport Utility Vehicle

You can't build a successful SUV today without incorporating comforts like leather and DVD players alongside trail-dominating suspension and chunky all-terrain tires. If any car proved this formula was a successful one, it was the car that did it first: the Jeep Wagoneer.

Fishing Sea to Shining Sea

The Complete Guide to Fishing Eight American Cities

Fishing is a lot of things to a lot of people, but one thing it's not is easily defined. Excluded from the latest definition, whose authors subscribed a little too obsessively to A River Runs Through It, is "ugly" fishing: the lines dropped from rocky piers, the lures twanged off bridge abutments, picking through the empty parking lot out behind Sears to get to the water. Modernity hasn't left fisherman many beautiful spots, but damn if that's gonna stop us. These eight cities prove that you can get away within the city limits, and that some of the best fishing in the country doesn't depend on a distant locale.

Lure Lore

The Art of the Fishing Lure

Fishermen have long known that fish are often smarter than they. But the rest of us probably haven't given the lures used to catch these clever, wary creatures their due. In fact, the best lures are really works of inventiveness, science, utility and even art.

From Tinkerer to Timekeeper

Talking Shop with Leo Padron, a New American Watchmaker

Leo Padron grew up a tinkerer, then turned his focus to fixing his grandfather's broken wristwatch. He succeeded...and then he started building his own. We talked to Padron, who today helms Padron Watch Co., a successful startup building three unique watches out of Minneapolis.

The Theater of Motorsport

Scuderia 120

There's a particular theater to motorsport. The hair-bristling caterwaul of a race exhaust. The aromas of hot metal mechanics. The gritty dust of tire soot. And that's for spectators. Step beyond the yellow line into pit row and things get far more visceral. And though we could prattle on in paragraphs about what it's like to be face-to-face with theatrics of racing Ferraris, we figured it best to report this story through the medium of film.


Robert Loomes: Bringing Watchmaking Back to the British Isles

Robert Loomes & Co., makes gorgeous watches in small, limited editions of 50 or 100 pieces. He joins the growing cadre of watchmakers who are pushing British watchmaking as far as possible, along with Christopher Ward, Roger Smith, and the brothers English.

It's a history lesson, bitches

A Front-Row Seat to Dave Chappelle’s Return

Before he took the stage at Radio City Music Hall last June, nine times to nine sold out audiences. Before his decade in seclusion. Before he walked away from a $50 million contract and onto a plane bound for South Africa. Before his two season show on Comedy Central elevated him to a demigod in social satire and racial comedy. Before Half Baked, Robin Hood: Men In Tights and performances in the Washington Square Park fountain, Dave Chappelle left high school after the bell rang and got onstage at a Tuesday night open mic. He was 14. He killed it.

Expect the Unexpected

Photo Essay: Traveling the Amazon by Riverboat

In much of the Amazon, traveling by riverboat is the best form of transportation. So we set off from Iquitos, Peru, fondly dubbed the Capital of the Peruvian Amazon, aboard the Aqua Aria, a luxurious river boat that would take us roughly 100 miles up and down the Amazon River.

The weird vehicles that started it all

CUV DNA: The Original Crossovers

While the marketing term "crossover" is a recent invention, the concept is not. Automakers have been making cars that fill the gap between utility vehicles and family cars for decades. Here are three that helped to determine what the crossover is today, along with their modern-day kindred spirits.

Hint: it involves flying fish roe

Montreal Meets New York, in a Bagel Shop

We get three bagel sandwich recipes from Black Seed Bagels in NYC, where they combine New York and Montreal styles to build the king of donut-shaped foods.

Two Biologists teach Montreal how good craft brews can be

Dieu du Ciel and the Science of Good Beer

A little over two decades ago, Stephane Ostiguy and Jean-Francois Gravel met while studying science at McGill University. Neither got their degrees -- but they do make some of the best beer in the world at Dieu du Ciel, Montreal's best craft brewery.

Storming the East Coast's best surf town

48 Hours of Sun and Swell in Montauk

When we invited Forest Woodward, one of our favorite photographers, to Montauk for the weekend, we had no idea we’d be graced with the best waves we’ve seen in years.

It's a Table With Stuff On It...

The Desks Of Gear Patrol

Some desks at Gear Patrol are dirty, some are disorganized and some are perfectly manicured. All of them showcase at least a small part of who we are and what we're passionate about.

Some MMasterful, All MMagnificent

The BMW M3 Through the Generations

Over the decades, BMW's iconic M3 has only grown in power, performance (and in most cases, weight), going from niche sports sedans to one of the most popular performance-focused automobiles in the industry. The best part? There are five generations of them, all with scintillating, unique details and the underlying similarities of greatness.

Home cooking gets an upgrade

Inside the New American Supper Club

Underground supper clubs, where strangers eat home-cooked meals made by professional chefs, are spreading throughout America. Gear Patrol sat down at one in Brooklyn, New York to see firsthand where the trend's headed.

Once Left for dead, a five-time Ironman winner returns to form

Jordan Rapp: Another Day at the Office

Pro triathlete Jordan Rapp is a poster boy for endurance -- and not just because he’s won five Ironmans, two Leadman Epic 250s and the 2011 ITU Long Distance World Championships. The more remarkable feat is that all but two of those victories came following a near-fatal hit-and-run accident.

The Hillclimb is alive with the sound of motors

The Goodwood Festival of Speed

The Goodwood Festival of Speed is more than just a motoring event. It's the product of one man's passion for all things automotive, fueled by hundreds of thousands of the worshiping faithful. Lord March, as Charles Gordon-Lennox is called, took possession of the 12,000-acre Goodwood Estate in 1993 and almost immediately started the Festival in the name of bringing racing back to its traditional home in West Sussex. He's effectively created a playground for both the annual event's spectators and its drivers.

Can a week of standing save you from a lifetime of sitting?

Learning to Work Standing Up

Should we all be working at stand-up desks? A GP correspondent reports on his week spent afoot.

Is there anything left to discover?

The Long Way in to Havasu Falls

Getting to Havasu Falls requires a flight to Phoenix, a five-hour drive to the Grand Canyon, and an eleven-mile hike in hundred-degree heat. And it's worth it.

What to watch between World Cups

The Rise of the European Soccer Fan in America

The United States Men’s National Soccer Team (#USMNT) was knocked out of the World Cup by Belgium in the Round of 16, but you already know this. You watched it. More people streamed the U.S.'s third World Cup match versus Germany -- which kicked off on a Wednesday afternoon -- than this year's Super Bowl. Their previous game versus Portugal was the most watched U.S. soccer game ever. Basically, if your television wasn't showing footy, you were either kidnapped or not a sports fan. But here’s the deal: the World Cup is an aberration. Soccer fans aren’t privileged to such an event every other month. It’s every fours years. After the final on July 13, players will travel back to their respective clubs (a “club” refers to a team and its organization), but what’ll we -- the masses of newly converted football fans, spoiled by perpetual matches -- do? Do we fall back under the veil of American ignorance, pretending it's a second-tier sport? No. Watch the MLS? Not just yet. Instead, we'll follow the world’s best players back to Europe. Here are the basics, and how to watch.

On the 'cue trail in Texas

The Lone Star Smokeshow: 6 Must-Eats on the Texas BBQ Trail

Texas is home to the original cowboys, the gunslingers and trailblazers. They pushed 20 million head of cattle through Dustbowl territory during the historic cattle drives. Beef is in their blood. And their barbecue is the best there is. We sought out the legendary joints in the heart of the Lone Star State.

5 Courses, 1 Grill, No Dishes

Master the One-Grill Meal

The life of a dinner shindig can be as simple as quality charcoal, a few tunes and some great beef. Oh, and good beer. The "One Grill Meal" isn't a challenging culinary proposition. In fact, outside of skillet cooking it's about as simple of a trick as they come. And whether your have propane or charcoal it's a pretty damn simple affair and about as American as it gets.

2,200 years of making shit go boom

A Quick, Flashy History of Fireworks

From bamboo shoots to Mongolian invasions to the Renaissance to Independence Day, we break down the complete history of fireworks and why we use them for the Fourth of July.