Photo Essay

Cars and car lovers dressed to kill

Photo Essay: Pebble Beach

There's no place on earth like the Pebble Beach's Concours d'Elegance. The cars on display at the world-renowned automotive festival are some of the finest and rarest feats of engineering and design the world has ever seen -- and that's just the parking lot.

Three days in Golden Gate Park

Photo Essay: Outside Lands

Kanye wore a mask. Wayne Coyne (The Flaming Lips), a bodysuit. There was lots of denim, leather, and a handful of Chucks. Some sang the blues, some beat a drum. Big Freedia got white booties poppin’, and Kacey Musgraves left hearts to swoon. GP reports from Outside Lands 2014.

Gators, fanboats and fishin'

Photo Essay: Fishing the Everglades by Fanboat

GP contributor Isaac Zapata set out by airboat in the Everglades and neighboring Big Cypress National Reserve to capture a glimpse of the incredibly rich ecosystem -- and a few fish.

The Quail Preview

Photo Essay: A Rare Look at an Even Rarer Ferrari Collection

Ferrari enthusiast and luxury watch retailer David Lee is headed to this year's The Quail at Pebble Beach. And, more importantly, he's bringing his collection of vintage Ferarri supercars with him. We got a sneak peak at some of his rare beauties.

A Prime Spot in Scotland's Scotch Valley

Photo Essay: Walking the Grounds at Aberlour Distillery

Among the big names of the central Speyside region -- Macallan, Glenfiddich, Glenlivet and Ardmore -- Aberlour garners less recognition than most. And yet it's consistently produced one of the most decorated single malt whiskies, with more than 185 awards since the mid-1980s. We walked the grounds of their distillery, which has continuously produced since 1879.

Atop Guatemala's Third Highest Peak

Photo Essay: Hiking Guatemala’s Acatenango Volcano

Acatenango is Guatemala’s third highest peak, towering 13,041 feet above the nearby Pacific Ocean and about 8,000 feet above the city of Antigua at the mountain’s base. Photographer and GP contributor Jonathan Levinson hiked to the top.

Expect the Unexpected

Photo Essay: Traveling the Amazon by Riverboat

In much of the Amazon, traveling by riverboat is the best form of transportation. So we set off from Iquitos, Peru, fondly dubbed the Capital of the Peruvian Amazon, aboard the Aqua Aria, a luxurious river boat that would take us roughly 100 miles up and down the Amazon River.

Storming the East Coast's best surf town

48 Hours of Sun and Swell in Montauk

When we invited Forest Woodward, one of our favorite photographers, to Montauk for the weekend, we had no idea we’d be graced with the best waves we’ve seen in years.

Keep the revs high

Road Trip Style: Italian Tuneup

One of the best ways to enjoy a summer weekend is a top-down road trip out of town. Pick up a fun roadster like an Alfa Romeo Spider (preferably in rosso corsa) for just these occasions.

Home cooking gets an upgrade

Inside the New American Supper Club

Underground supper clubs, where strangers eat home-cooked meals made by professional chefs, are spreading throughout America. Gear Patrol sat down at one in Brooklyn, New York to see firsthand where the trend's headed.

Taking the Long Way 'Round

Photo Essay: Sailing with Team Alvimedica of the Volvo Ocean Race

Unlike the America’s Cup, which is all about speed over a short distance, the Volvo Ocean Race is a challenge of endurance. In this year’s running of the race, starting in October in Alicante, Spain, crews of eight sailors will race around the globe in stages lasting up to four weeks at a time, stopping in various ports such as Capetown, Auckland and Newport along the way. We set sail with Team Alvimedica as they trained out of their home port of Newport, Rhode Island.

The Hillclimb is alive with the sound of motors

The Goodwood Festival of Speed

The Goodwood Festival of Speed is more than just a motoring event. It's the product of one man's passion for all things automotive, fueled by hundreds of thousands of the worshiping faithful. Lord March, as Charles Gordon-Lennox is called, took possession of the 12,000-acre Goodwood Estate in 1993 and almost immediately started the Festival in the name of bringing racing back to its traditional home in West Sussex. He's effectively created a playground for both the annual event's spectators and its drivers.

Classic cars, Champagne and yachts

Photo Essay: 2014 Monaco Grand Prix Historique

From the Archives: The Historic Grand Prix is one of the most important historic track events of the year, and it’s easy to see why: throughout the weekend, classic cars of all sorts drive the circuit in downtown Monaco, drivers mingle in their race suits, mechanics tinker, car nuts scoop their tongues off the ground and tall women glide by in cocktail dresses and heels.

Bringing wild shores to your mundane coffee table

Photo Essay: Distant Shores

From the Archives: Surf photographer Chris Burkard’s recent book is a 180-page hardcover with photos from diverse locations including Alaska, Chile, Iceland, India and Japan. These photos, which Burkard shared with GP, document his adventures traveling across the world as he captured photos of surfers and the natural world they inhabit.

On the 'cue trail in Texas

The Lone Star Smokeshow: 6 Must-Eats on the Texas BBQ Trail

Texas is home to the original cowboys, the gunslingers and trailblazers. They pushed 20 million head of cattle through Dustbowl territory during the historic cattle drives. Beef is in their blood. And their barbecue is the best there is. We sought out the legendary joints in the heart of the Lone Star State.

As the U.S. Battles Belgium

Inside Google’s World Cup War Room

If the World Cup isn’t about triumph or tragedy as eleven countrymen fight for national pride with illustrious skill, then dammit, it’s about data. And where there is data, there is Google. Every match a team of analysts, writers, and artists are standing by holding their finger to the social pulse of the world, and when something big happens, Google’s World Cup War Room responds.

Pool Hopping in Sweden, 26 Times

Ö Till Ö

The Ö Till Ö run/swim race in Sweden is 46 miles long. That's an impressive distance -- especially when you consider that 6 miles are in the water and the remaining 40 miles take racers over the rocky terrain of 26 islands off the coast of Stockholm.

The capital of empires, today

Photo Essay: The Controlled Chaos of Istanbul

Istanbul is a great place to visit: it's located right smack on the dividing line between Europe and Asia, with a wealth of historical and religious sites, bazaars, a rich food culture and nearby islands that can be gotten to via ferry rides. Photographer and GP contributor Isaac Zapata recently explored the city and experienced its "clash of beauty, history and a controlled sort of chaos."

Shades of Tennis's Most Unique Tournament

Photo Essay: French Red

The French have two Brits to thank for their beloved red playing surface, which today lives on in small training centers on the outskirts of Paris, tournaments for the rising stars of the sport, and one of professional tennis’s oldest events. We were on hand during the week of the French Open to capture all the nuance of the storied surface.

The Sights to accompany the sounds

Photo Essay: Governors Ball

On June 6th, over 40,000 people descended on Randalls Island, NY for the first of three music packed days at the Governors Ball Music Festival. On any other day of the year, Randalls Island’s 520 acres sit silent. But for three days straight, from 12:15pm until 11pm, music performers from Vampire Weekend to Outkast to Skrillex to The Strokes take the stage under the hot summer sun and the starless night that hangs over Manhattan. GP was there, and this is what we saw.

First, third or last: Italy always wins

Gran Premio d’Italia

The Autodromo Internazionale del Mugello, a 3.25 mile serpent of asphalt nestled within the Tuscan Appenine Mountains just north of Florence, plays host every year to the Gran Premio d’Italia MotoGP race -- the home race for Ducati Corse. With only one world championship to its name (2007) and zero dry-weather victories during the 2013 season, the Ducati Team had the eyes of a nation following its every move this past weekend at the fastest track on the calendar.

Hawaii's Old Man in the Sea

Photo Essay: Ocean to Mountain in Kaua’i

Volcanic activity lifted Hawaii's oldest island up from the ocean floor six million years ago, and millennia of rainfall -- amounts on par with the highest on Earth -- have carved out deep valleys, gorgeous waterfalls and ridges that rise thousands of feet into the air like razors set on edge. In this photo essay we explore both summit and sea.

An Unlikely Expat

A Visit to Thule’s U.S. Headquarters in Seymour, CT

If you’re into the outdoors and own a car, chances are you own or have owned a Thule product for hauling your skis, bikes, kayaks and other outdoor gear. Nearly 80 percent of the company's products for the U.S. market are made in the states, many of them at their Seymour, CT facility. We dropped in for a visit.

Classic cars, Champagne and yachts

Photo Essay: 2014 Monaco Grand Prix Historique

The Historic Grand Prix is one of the most important historic track events of the year, and it’s easy to see why: throughout the weekend, classic cars of all sorts drive the circuit in downtown Monaco, drivers mingle in their race suits, mechanics tinker, car nuts scoop their tongues off the ground and tall women glide by in cocktail dresses and heels.

A Beautiful Grind on Ancient Rocks

Photo Essay: Running the Grand Canyon

Going “Rim to Rim to Rim” is a double-crossing of the Grand Canyon, covering 42.4 miles and 22,000 feet of vertical, and it’s a rite of passage for ultra runners. GP contributor Ben Clark reports on his epic there-and-back-again run.

Finding the Foodie Gems of Israel's Second Largest City

Photo Essay: A Food Tour of Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv-based photographer Danya Weiner and food stylist Deanna Linder share their picks for the city's best restaurants.

Glacial peaks, wild rivers and one totaled car

Photo Essay: Wild Oregon

Over the course of 2,500 miles of driving and exploration, photographer Chris Burkard encountered glacial peaks, wild rivers, rain forests, volcanic lakes, historic rock climbs and even the home of The Goonies. His stage: the great state of Oregon in the devastatingly grand Pacific Northwest.

A New Home For American MotoGP

Photo Essay: The Grand Prix Of The Americas

Each corner at the Circuit of The Americas is an homage to the most iconic turns from the world of Grand Prix. The track's red, white and blue runoff areas make a declaration that's even more clear when seen from above, perched atop the infield's 250-foot observation tower: the international motorcycling scene has found a vibrant home in America.

These are a few of our favorite things

Photo Essay: Cars and Coffee

From the Archives: One of my favorite things to do on a Saturday is roll out of bed at 5:30 a.m., grab a camera and my jacket and drive 48 miles from LA to a business park in Irvine. There, on any given Saturday, hundreds of cars worth millions of dollars gather for Cars and Coffee, a special event where two common denominators create a mood of friendship, relaxation and shared passion.

Cutting Crew

Photo Essay: Geno’s Barberia

Geno learned to be a barber in Montenegro at age 13. His shop in downtown Manhattan is our favorite place to go for a cut and a shave.

Breckenridge's New Expansion Wows

Photo Essay: Capturing Peak Six on Film

More than 50 years in the making, the 540-acre Peak 6 opened on Christmas Day, 2013, bringing a fantastic mix of terrain that fills a surprising gap in Breckenridge's arsenal. The new terrain offers some of the only above-treeline skiing for intermediates in the country and even more of Breck's famous expert terrain. There was no doubt that we had to give it a test -- strictly for investigative reasons, of course.

Chasing Sun in the Southwest

Photo Essay: Running the Zion Traverse

Mountaineer and ultra runner Ben Clark shares photos from his single-day run across Zion National Park, also known as the Zion Traverse.

This Scotish archipelago has no shortage of history

Photo Essay: The Orkney Islands

Orkney, as it’s called by the locals, is an archipelago of 70 islands off the northern tip of the Scottish mainland. At one point or another, Vikings, Norwegians and Scots all listed the Old Red Sandstone outcrops as their home. The Neolithic monuments of these ancient inhabitants are one of Orkney’s biggest draws; another, of...

Haute Cuisine in the Divine City

Photo Essay: The Dorrance

Welcome to The Dorrance, granddaddy of Rhode Island's burgeoning fine dining scene. It's housed in a former Federal Reserve bank. The confit chicken wings are crispy. Your cocktail is waiting on the bar.

121 Leagues South of Miami

Photo Essay: Cayman Sister Islands

Unlike Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac don’t have car dealerships, fancy restaurants, banks or clubs. The only company is the companion you flew in with, red-footed boobies, and disarmingly laid back residents who are quick to smile and even faster to offer help. Visit once and you’ll return for life.

A Weekend at the Big Dance

Photo Essay: The 2014 NCAA’s Mens Final Four

The NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament is a full-blown cultural phenomenon, complete with its own vernacular and pseudoscience. We headed down to Dallas to experience this year’s finale and and snapped some photos in between occasional showers, shortages of $9 Miller Lites and gridlocked crowds.

May God have mercy on your quads

Photo Essay: The Jerusalem Marathon

Every religion has its pilgrimages, many of them to Jerusalem. Christians visit the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Muslims, the Dome of the Rock. Jews pray at the Western Wall. Running, while not an official religion, is nevertheless a sport of the pious, and its acolytes meet once a year at the Jerusalem Marathon. We were on hand at this year’s race to take in the struggle and the glory of the scenic 26.2-mile course.

Haus Sweet Haus

A Walk Through the VitraHaus

Though opened nearly four years ago, the VitraHaus remains a pilgrimage-worthy menagerie of design. Located in the German town of Weil-am-Rhein and built by famed builders Herzog & de Meuron, the VitraHaus is series of stacked longhouses filled with an assemblage of classic and contemporary design goods for the home. Visitors are encouraged to not just gaze in the standard museum sense, but to touch and interact with everything. A walk-through had us rethinking our own homes.

Seriously fashionable cyclists

Photo Essay: New York Bike Style

New York City has the largest bike-share system in the country, with 600 stations and 10,000 bikes, not to mention more than 600 miles of bike lanes. But as photographer Sam Polcer's new book, New York Bike Style, shows, the cyclists themselves -- and their style -- are a city treasure. Polcer, who regularly photographs cyclists in New York for his blog, Preferred Mode, shared a preview of his book with GP.

The Forecast Calls For Pain

Photo Essay: Power Of 4 Ski Mountaineering Race

The basic premise of the sport is to ski up and down a resort or backcountry course as fast a possible -- think trail running, but with ultralight ski gear, winter conditions, and powder turns on the downhill. After spending most of this winter chasing deep powder in Utah's Wasatch Range, we decided to put our months of dawn patrol and long ski weekends of training to the test in one of the sport's most prestigious North American races, the Power of 4 in Aspen, CO.

Bringing wild shores to your mundane coffee table

Photo Essay: Distant Shores

Surf photographer Chris Burkard’s latest project is a 180-page hardcover with photos from diverse locations including Alaska, Chile, Iceland, India and Japan. These photos, which Burkard shared with GP, document his adventures traveling across the world as he captured photos of surfers and the natural world they inhabit.

13 Mile Chill

Photo Essay: New England’s Winter Surfers

The sky is a slate gray on the cruise up I-95 to Hampton Beach, NH. I left Boston to catch a glimpse of a handful of New England’s athlete-contrarians, people who spend the summer dreaming of frigid waters, storms and angry seas. They're winter surfers -- and this is their season.

A caving expedition in Belize

Descending into the Mayan Underworld

We’d been underground for five hours, as deep as 600 feet below the surface of the jungle in a cave the Belizeans call the Mountain Cow Cave. The cavern has been rebranded for tourists as the more picturesque-sounding Crystal Cave, though few tourists make it here. Unlike the more famous and accessible Actun Tunichil Muchnal cave, which sees thousands of visitors per year, Crystal Cave only sees a few hundred, most only peeking into its impressive foyer. I could see why. It was not for the faint of heart.