Sports

Pick Six

The Beginner’s Guide to Betting the Super Bowl

In advance of the biggest American sporting event of the year, many people start thinking about placing a bet or two. For those who don't know the difference between a fullback and a backpack, it's a harrowing time. But, with a little education, you too can get in on the action.

A board meeting you want to be part of

Best Snowboards of 2014

Nostalgia is an attractive creature, and we often find ourselves getting sentimental over microbrews about our gear of yore and cool vintage finds. But like the skis we came across in Park City, neither the Snurfer nor the Burton Backhill were performance decks. Nobody back in the day was talking about carbon and kevlar layup or cambered medley -- not sober, anyway. Today the construction materials and technology that go into snowboard making produce rides for every body type, terrain and personal preference. These five boards are some of the finest in each category.

Killer Pow, Bro

Photo Essay: Skis from a Bygone Era

Skis have become impossibly technical -- not with complicated gadgets and moving parts, but other things that engineers geek out over like ski geometry, core materials and physics. In this photo essay we recall a bygone era of skis when color schemes were impossibly neon, patterns were questionable and bindings were more like door hinges.

Powderhound Perfection

Photo Essay: Wagner x GP Skis

The pipe dream of skis built to fit your style and body has long been the realm of pro racers and big mountain free skiers. Decidedly unsponsored skiers like us have always had to make do with off-the-rack solutions -- until now. One small Telluride, Colorado boutique manufacturer, Wagner Custom Skis, has a secret formula for designing and building the best personalized skis in the world at prices that are accessible to most serious skiers. Together with Wagner's engineers we designed a pair of ultimate ski mountaineering boards; then we put them to the test among the famous 13,000 foot peaks of Telluride Mountain Resort.

Don't lose your head

5 Best Helmets for Snow Sports

These days, seeing someone without a helmet on the slopes is a rarity; more than 70 percent of all mountain-goers are donning them, and countless brands are releasing offerings onto the market. With hundreds of brain buckets to choose from, though, the task of finding the right one can be daunting -- but, with your IQ and major bodily functions on the line, we beg you to persevere. To help, we've rounded up our five favorite snow sports helmets covering the spectrum from high-tech to lightweight.

Heads-Up on the Hill

Tested: Oakley Airwave 1.5

In 2012, Oakley partnered with Recon Instruments, maker of groundbreaking Heads-up Display (HUD) technology, to create the Airwave goggle and bring data and entertainment right into the wearer’s field of view, a la Minority Report. The second generation Oakley Airwave 1.5 ($649) launched at the end of 2013 with improvements across the board. We got our hands on a pair to test while shredding pow in Revelstoke, BC.

Bound for Success

Locked In: 5 Best Ski Bindings

Bindings often go overlooked in favor of the flashiness of a new pair of skis or boots. But as your only contact point for control and power transfer along the 170-180cm boards you’re strapping on, and your final line of safety in a major crash, they’re the most important piece of gear for a successful and safe season. Read on for a breakdown of the best ski bindings for this season.

Sculpting the Mountain

The Architect

Now in its seventh season, the Salomon Freeski TV channel has covered the sport exhaustively. In "The Architect", Vice President of Resort Design at Ecosign Mountain Resort Planners, Ryley Thiessen, explains how resort development has changed from the 1960s to today, bringing us from mom-and-pop mountains (now all but extinct) to four-season resorts in China.

Crash into me, baby

Tested: Evolv Iceman Bouldering Pad

Bouldering is a relatively new evolution in rock climbing, and lacking ropes or other protection makes it one of the more dangerous. With steep overhangs and extremely technical moves, you're going to spend a significant portion of the day falling on your butt, making a good crash pad absolutely essential. We recently had an opportunity to practice bouldering in the limestone caves of American Fork Canyon and the sandstone crags of Moab, where our well-worn Evolv Iceman Crash Pad ($135) was a constant source of support.

No parks? No problem

Deep Cuts: Riding and Rappelling in the American Southwest

Our trip with Gerard is an audible. A group of journalists organized by mountain bike tour operator Sacred Rides, we came for a taste of the company’s newest offering: a tour of the Southwest’s outdoor adventure gems, from singletrack bike trails to world-famous slot canyons. But with Zion National Park closed by the federal government shutdown, we’ve changed tack and hired him to help us navigate nearby Yankee Doodle Canyon -- a technical descent that promises to mimic Zion’s architecture. The road to Yankee Doodle, usually deserted, is littered with dawdling sightseers who walk the road in place of a trail. The shoulder has become a makeshift parking lot full of cars with out-of-state plates.

Inside cycling's hottest discipline

The Cyclocross Experience

Sometimes you sprint at the end of a cyclocross race. But you always sprint at the beginning. As I straddle my top tube on the starting grid waiting for the whistle to send off my category at the Coyote Point Bay Area Super Prestige, I know this sprint start will hurt more than most.

Ridin' Dirty

The Best Cyclocross Bikes for Every Rider

Cyclocross racing pits riders on bikes with drop bars and knobby tires against each other on multi-lap courses over a mix of grass, dirt, pavement, sand, mud and sections that force riders to carry their bikes over barriers and up stairs and hills. Racers attack from the line, and the intensity doesn’t diminish for the duration of the 30- to 60-minute events -- it’s a redline-all-the-time, full-contact affair. With participation doubling over the past five years, it's also the fastest growing segment of competitive cycling in America. Some attribute this growth to the more laid-back, beer-primed environment at cyclocross races, but cool bikes certainly don't hurt. We've got three rigs that make the grade from the starter's gun well past the finish line.

It's never too cold

Kit: Winter Running

It’s not like getting up for that pre-work run was easy during the summer or fall. Now it’s pitch black, relentlessly cold and the streets are covered with ice, snow and salt. But a brisk jog before sunrise is a one-way ticket to a fulfilling day, not to mention a long winter of staying fit despite a dining regimen of braised short ribs and mashed potatoes. The right gear will keep you warm, dry and, most importantly, stable when the ground beneath you isn't.

See How it All Ends

Conquering La Ruta de Los Conquistadores: The Film

Nearly a year after his training began, Dirk Shaw called from Costa Rica, where he had just completed the final mission in The Road to La Ruta: the race itself. He explained how he’d learned to enjoy the process as much as the culminating event. Process over product. Wise words, Mr. Shaw. But we also know that race day happens to be both process and product, when reason and reflection give way to adrenaline and ecstasy -- or despair. Deep, raw despair that people in the industry call “injury”, “mechanical failure”, or simply “Did Not Finish”. Luckily, as Dirk's grueling journey from coast to coast and peak to peak unfolded, we had someone on hand to document the dramatic highs and lows. Now we present the final chapter in the Road to La Ruta series, our film of the epic race.

Conquering La Ruta

Suffering Shared: The Road to La Ruta, Part 8

Suffering is a universal language. October 24-26 were the hardest three days I have ever spent on a bike, but they were also the most connected I have ever felt with the people and the world around me. The power of a shared experience, through joy and pain, transcends almost everything. It crushes barriers of language and culture. Now I know why everyone becomes so emotionally bonded to the La Ruta de Los Conquistadores: words are unnecessary when you have shared the suffering of a ride that is practically straight up for nearly two hours in the blazing heat.

Lifelong surf legend

30 Minutes With: Robert August

If you’re looking for a lesson in the good life, look no further than Robert August. At 18 he starred in The Endless Summer, the first great surfing film, taking him on a seven-month world tour of uncharted breaks. The rest, as they say, is history. August went on to launch an eponymous line of surfboards, which he still shapes today. We caught up with him at Witch’s Rock Surf Camp in Tamarindo, Costa Rica, to talk about parenting, lamb chops and the difference between monkeys and people.

A Basketball coach, literally

Tested: 94Fifty Basketball

This year, the basketball gets a new update in the form of the 94Fifty ($295), a Bluetooth-enabled basketball that pairs with your mobile device to track shot speed, dribble force, control, spin, and acceleration. Posted to Kickstarter on March 5th, it crushed its $100,000 goal in a little over a month. We took it for a test run.

Gifts for the resident jock

12 Guys of Christmas: The Athlete

Part of you doesn’t want to buy The Athlete any gift at all. He roughhouses at the Thanksgiving football game; he runs negative splits at the charity 5K; he seems to be toweling off every time your girlfriend is around. While we’re all worse for wear, he’s aging like a Rodin. But ultimately, he’s a good guy who just really likes to get the blood flowing. He whipped you into shape for Tough Mudder, remember? And who came along for a second opinion when you bought the used Cervelo? Who’s consistently willing to do an aerial chest bump? Yeah, that’s him. Go ahead, get him a little something nice for the holidays this year. We've got all the ideas you need.

Gear for the Top of World

Kit: Free Solo Climbing

Sometimes the mountains just call your name. Whether you've got a season to train for a summit bit up Mt. Rainier or just a Saturday afternoon to log some miles hiking up the local ski hill, the right gear can mean the difference between enjoying the majesty and struggling through misery (or worse). Here's the gear we used for our recent solo free climb of Mount Olympus in Utah -- but it's perfect for any ultralight mountain mission.

No Ropes, No Worries

Opinion: In Defense of Free Soloing

Some of my friends and family actually do think I'm a little crazy. This summer I decided to really find out what drives me to climb, what pushes me to expand my own vertical limits. What better way to really connect with myself and with the wall than to do it like the early purists and those on the leading edge of the sport today -- with no ropes and no worries?

Climb, Splash, Repeat

Photo Essay: Psicobloc Masters Series

Imagine cranking your way up an unforgiving rock face, no ropes or safety protection, just your fingers and wits pitted against every crimpy, stretched out, exposed move. At the hardest moment your grip finally gives out and you plunge more than thirty feet -- to a splash landing in the Olympic Training Pool in Park City, Utah. For some, this kind of climbing, called deep water soloing, is the stuff of nightmares. For the few dozen professional climbers and thousands of spectators at the recent Psicobloc Masters Series, it's a progression of the sport unparalleled in its difficulty and exhilaration. We captured the action from the pool deck.

Fleet Footed

Best Running Shoes

Collectively we spend a lot of time running: we’re Ironman finishers, ultramarathoners, trail runners, joggers and ad-hoc sprinters, police fleers (seldom to never) and woman chasers (only when we know her). 2013 was a good year for running shoes of all stripes and three of them stood out to us. These shoes -- the New Balance Minimus Hi-Rez, Hoka One One Rapa Nui 2, and Salomon S-Lab Sense Ultra ($120+) -- are drastically different in design, but each is free of gimmicks and encourages a natural running stride.

Like Mike

94Fifty Smart Basketball

It seems like everything is becoming quantified these days. Not to be left out, the data-mining 94Fifty Bluetooth Sensor has made its way into one of America's most popular sports. 94Fifty Bluetooth Sensor Basketballs ($300), made in partnership with Spalding, are the first digital sports products to be embedded with inertial motion sensors, serving up coaches and players with various metrics concerning ballhandling, shooting, jump-explosion, defensive foot-speed agility and athleticism.

Race. Rinse. Repeat.

Get Well: 5 Best Recovery Tools

If you think that your performance on race day is only tied to your best efforts on the track or your bike during training, you're overlooking the most important part of your training cycle: recovery. By spending all day focusing on how you're going to break your body down during your next CrossFit binge and not on how you're going to rebuild and progress, you're already two steps behind your competitors. Read on for the best recovery products to step up your game.

Not a treatise on Pink Floyd

Opinion: Rethinking “The Wall”

There’s a lot happening in the body that’s implied by the catch-all word “bonk” (a.k.a. “hitting the wall”). While the resulting symptoms can occur at once as a symphony of pain and delirium, it’d be a mistake to think they all have the same cause and the same treatment. In my opinion, the the most valuable distinction for beginner long-distance runners is between dehydration and a glycogen bonk, or, generally speaking, running out of stored carbs to burn.

More than a marathon

The Complete Guide to Running Your First Ultramarathon

You’ve probably been hearing more about them: occasional murmurs of very long distance races, men and women running six marathons across the Sahara, a 3,100 mile race in Queens, NY, in the middle of summer. Ultrarunning, or running more than a 26.2 mile marathon in a single shot, seems an unlikely pursuit -- and it is. But it's also growing. An estimated 60,000 people finished an ultra in the U.S. in 2012, up from about 10,000 in 1990. That number is still small compared to the 487,000 people who completed a marathon in the U.S. in 2012, but it’s still an awful lot of people running exceptional distances. And now you’re thinking about toeing the line for an ultra. Good for you. We’ve got a handy guide to help you through, complete with advice from a few pros at the top of the sport.

May the Force Be With You

Fitbit Force

Fitbit's newly announced Force ($130) is one of the most advanced activity trackers released to date, greatly improving on the company's earlier Flex product in particular. But its ultimate appeal and success with consumers may rely just as much on the Smart-Watch-like features that have come along for the ride.

Initiate Ghost Protocol

Five Ten STEALTH MI6 Rubber

In 2010, the crew of the latest Mission: Impossible movie called Charles Cole, Five Ten's president, with one simple question: could he design a shoe that could climb up a glass wall? Cole and his team went to work on their Stealth C4 rubber, rebuilding it stickier than ever. The result? Rubber that is viscous enough to gain purchase on glass (just watch Tom Cruise use it in Mission: Impossible), while maintaining the durability to do battle with even the sharpest rock faces. We got a look at Five Ten's Team VXi and Freerider VXi Element ($125), two groundbreaking pieces of footwear.

Reality is looking pretty good

K2 Ultra Dream

Most of the snowboarding industry's technology slowly creeps forward with marginal improvements: things get better, but not way better. This year K2 dropped something that falls squarely into the way better category: their Ultra Dream Snowboard ($550), a cunning combination of the brand's recent technological advances.

Fence, Swim, Jump, Shoot and Run

30 Minutes With: Justin Torrellas

Think that vegans don't get the protein needed to really compete? Think again. Justin Torrellas, a raw vegan athlete, spent the past year at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO, training for the 2016 Olympics in the modern pentathlon. We caught up with the former bassoonist to talk about children's books, positivity, and the value of short shorts.

Everything Else is Slow R

Adidas Terrex Fast R GTX

You don't have to be a genius to understand that there are trade-offs in life, a fact that applies to products as well. The spork notwithstanding, hybrid products typically appeal to a broader swath of the population in exchange for being less desirable to enthusiasts in either of the original disciplines. The Adidas Terrex Fast R GTX hiking shoe ($180) stands out for being both nimble and rugged; it's not a compromise, but an elevation above and beyond what exists in the lightweight hiker category.

The Only Skis You Need

DPS Wailer 112RP

We first heard about Utah ski brand DPS from a few locals after poaching some storm day powder lines at Snowbird Ski Resort a couple of seasons ago. Over a few apres ski beers in the lodge they spoke in hushed tones of ultralight carbon fiber skis that a few of the pros were using to rip steeper lines and push faster speeds than ever before. Turns out, if you're hunting for the best ski of 2013, adding to your growing quiver, or even downsizing to a "one ski fits all", there just isn't a ski that handles the entire mountain like the Wailer 112RP ($1,249).

Powerful Pedals

Garmin Vector

For truly superior training effectiveness on the bike, you need to unleash your full power. That means monitoring power output under real-world conditions, and for that there's no than the Garmin Vector ($1,700). With an unparalleled ease of installation and compatibility with any ANT+ head unit, the Vector gives you accurate power output at the pedal that's easily swapped between your road and tri bikes. But remember, only use your power for good -- like crushing the competition.

Outdoor Origami

Oru Kayak

Until now, our experience with origami was limited to bar tricks and entertaining children -- and we’ll be damned if turning a napkin into a swan isn’t a crowd pleaser. But what if you could apply the principles of the Japanese art of paper folding to a piece of high-performance outdoor equipment that typically weighs upwards of 50 pounds and requires a roof rack to transport? You’d have the Oru Kayak ($1,095), a foldable 12-foot boat made in the U.S.A. from a single sheet of double-layered plastic that folds down into a 33 x 29 x 10-inch case.

No Trail? No Problem

Flexible Footwear: 5 Best Approach Shoes

Somewhere between short day hikes in Yellowstone and forays above the tree line to bag a couple of Colorado 14ers last year, you probably realized your trail runners or light hiking shoes just don't cut it on off-trail, gnarly terrain. Technical approach shoes blend everything you like about your trail-running shoes -- ankle support, beefy soles, light weight -- with the sticky rubber and technical details of a climbing shoe or heavier boot. If you're going to spend a few hours tackling slot canyons in red rock country or slogging long miles to your favorite local peak -- or even if you just want a little extra support to stick on the mountain, these approach shoes will keep you on the trail.

Trout and Eternal Salvation

GP100: Scott Radian Fly Rod

The Scott Radian ($795) is the rod for the fly fisher in pursuit of two seemingly averse characteristics: power and finesse. This is definitely a gun, firing out 50 feet of line and more on demand; there's plenty of power to cut through wind and shoot line. But the Radian also has the delicacy required to make short casts of 15 to 25 feet and not spook fish. On the water, the result of all this high-brow build quality is throwing a fly with pinpoint accuracy at distances many only dream about.

Bird of Prey

GP100: Kestrel Legend SL

For professional cyclists, cost is no deterrent to ensuring they fly the latest and greatest ride with the best components. The race-worthy Kestrel Legend SL ($6450) delivers that same five-figure ride without the five-figure price tag. With a carbon fiber frame that's stiff where you want it for responsiveness and compliant for maximum comfort over long miles and a Dura Ace Di2 gruppo for topflight componentry, this is a ride that won't hold you back. Now, you just have to do as Signor Coppi advises, "Ride the bike."

Ultra prepared

Kit: Vermont 50 Ultramarathon

There are basically two schools of thought when assembling a kit for an ultramarathon: comprehensive preparation and more weight, or as minimalist as possible. For first-time ultra-distance runners, the decision can be a little confounding. You want to be very prepared and very light. This setup for the Vermont 50 -- a trail run -- reflects a good balance of preparedness and weight, with a bias toward the former in the choice of a hydration pack.

Pressurized hydration

Tested: Geigerrig Rig 500

It doesn’t take a degree in developmental psychology to know that guys have an enduring attachment to backpacks. Messenger bags, tote bags, duffels -- all great, but backpacks are hands-free, versatile and have more sophisticated storage options for gear and the lunch mom packed...or whatever. Faced with a quick international trip or a tough physical challenge, we’ve usually got a backpack in tow, and at the 20th anniversary of the Vermont 50 ultarmarathon, we leaned on the Geigerrig Rig 500 ($130) for our hydration and storage needs during an all-day run.

Late-blooming triathlon athlete

30 Minutes With: Chris Lieto

In 1997, Chris Lieto saw the Hawaii Ironman Triathlon World Championship on TV and decided to start training. Three years later, he became a professional triathlete. We caught up with the one-time mortgage broker to talk about technology, charity, and eating a healthy diet.

The antithesis of the treadmill

Switchback Sprinters: 10 Best Trail Running Shoes

After a long day stuck in the office or boardroom, sometimes pounding pavement just doesn't cut it. The right shoes make the difference between enjoying the boulder field at 10,000 feet and calling it a day at the first stream crossing. Whether you're training for the Sky Running Race of Champions or just looking to trade your tried and true 5k evening run in for some time on gravel and dirt, GP's testers have a shoe for every off-road run.

Marathon man

The Complete Guide to Running Your First Marathon

In the marathon origin story, Pheidippides runs from Marathon to Athens to deliver a message of victory and then promptly dies. We’ve come a long way since 490 BC, and today most people run marathons to compete, challenge themselves physically or raise money for charity -- and they rarely kick the bucket at the end. But they’re sometimes in a world of hurt, because running 26.2 miles is a feat, and doing it can be taxing on the body. But with the right training anyone can do it. Looking to join the club? We’ve got some tips, tricks and advice from experts to get you most of the way there. You’ve still got to run the damn thing.

Neither rain nor sleet nor snow...

All-Weather Endurance: 5 Best Running Jackets

If we had it our way, every run would start and finish in perfect weather. But Mother Nature's idea of perfect isn't always a picturesque sunset or a sunny beach. For those of us not living in a running commercial, sometimes the long-mileage day may start with a thunderstorm or a few inches of snow. Whether you're just heading around the block a few times, working on your interval training or putting in a marathon, we've found the best running jackets for soldiering through the tough stuff.

Rewind: The Cycling Issue

The winter. To most cyclists it means eating too much and enjoying earned time off. To some it means hellish 15-hour weeks on the indoor trainer, preparing in earnest for next season. But to all of us it means longing for short-sleeved summer rides, spring classics and stronger legs next year. Luckily, just before the...