Travel

A portrait of a changing beach town

Sunset in Montauk

In the last decade of summers, more and more tourists have pushed farther down Long Island until, invariably, they've arrived at its end: the little town of Montauk. With increased tourism comes money, but for many in Montauk, it also brings a yearly headache of inebriated vacationers, rising rent prices, congested beaches and changing culture in between harsh, wasteland-like winters. We set out to Montauk to talk to six locals -- a policeman, a teacher, a surfer, a scenester, a fisherman and a retiree -- about why and how Montauk is changing.

Digging Up History on the Kalaupapa Peninsula

Finding the “Real” Hawaii in Molokai’s Leper Colony

There I was, coming down the mountain like a kid on a playground, happy to finally be in the “real Hawaii”, and all of a sudden I realized that I’d arrived at a leper colony -- one where people still lived.

More: Hawaii
Come for the Views, Stay for the Rest

At The View Hotel in Monument Valley, the Name Says it All

It doesn’t take a genius to figure out why they decided to name it The View Hotel. Each of the hotel’s 95 rooms features a balcony that faces directly out over the buttes of Monument Valley, providing a thrilling front-row seat for some of the most beautiful terrain in the world.

More: Stay
The Virgil To Your Dante

The Best Travel Guidebooks for Every Journey

Everybody needs help when in a foreign place. And there's no shame in owning a travel guide. In fact, it's encouraged. Choose one of the below guidebooks to be the Virgil to your Dante as you feel your way through a new world.

Breaking Ice Across the Great Lakes

Of Ice and Men

Last winter, Great Lakes sailors suffered the worst ice navigation season in 30 years. Over 95 percent of Lake Superior was covered with blue ice, some of it 50 inches thick. We boarded a freighter for the last crossing of the season.

Blinded by the white

Photo Essay: Cat Boarding at Baldface Lodge

Baldface Lodge is the mecca for powder hounds with a passion for backcountry in its purest sense, boasting over 32,000 acres of unadulterated terrain and 500 inches of fresh throughout a typical season.

At Last, The Upper Hand

Climbers Summit El Capitan, the World’s Hardest Climb

On January 14, after 19 straight days of clinging to Yosemite’s El Capitan, climbers Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson successfully completed the first free ascent of the 5.14d Dawn Wall, widely considered the most difficult big wall rock climb in the world.

Snow, Serenity and Sweat

15 Places to Cross-Country Ski in the US

For the more exercise-centric, or athletes who simply want to try something new, cross-country skiing might be the best way to experience the winter outdoors. We've picked out the 15 best Nordic ski areas America has to offer.

Portugal's majestic islands

72 Hours in the Azores

The Azores, a chain of nine islands just west of Portugal, are a melting pot of landscapes and cultures, evoking Hawaii, Scandinavia, Seattle and Wisconsin in the space of an hour.

Stopping to Smell the Wildflowers

Getting to Know Australia on the Larapinta Trail

Outdoor enthusiasts sometimes turn their backs on organized, outfitted tours. But as a first-time visitor to Australia, GP contributor Will McGough was glad to hike the Larapinta Trail with a handful of locals.

The Pros and Cons of Abandoning Europe's Hiking Hut System

Hiking the Alps, Sans Huts

Dan had mentioned his novel idea before our summer trip to Switzerland: we’d go backpacking, in the Alps -- no huts. Bring your sleeping bags and bivy sacks, he said. Brilliant, I thought.

Butter and Brine

Scallops in the Raw

The two fishermen who delivered the scallop shells walked right through the back kitchen door of the restaurant like they were barging into their own home, big and fishy-looking.

A Hike with a Ghost in the Scottish Highlands

Remembering Travelers Lost

Among all the wonderful people I met on our Scotland trip, the most memorable wasn’t someone new, and it wasn’t a re-acquaintance. It was someone I’d already lost.

Sheep Think They're Better Than Me, and They're Right

The Dangerous Futility of Sheep-Chasing

The average Scottish sheep weighs between 100 to 300 pounds, lives ten to twelve years, breeds seasonally and, somewhere inside its stupid, thick skull, thinks it’s an absolutely magnificent creature. This is because, in Scotland, it has no natural predators. Except for us sheep chasers.

Deeper Into the Heart of Scotland

Photo Essay: North Through the Highlands

We drove north toward our next destination, the Isle of Skye. Everything had thinned out but the country, which was opening up wider and wider, the mountains taller and the glens deeper, the colors around us shifting from warm greens to striking shades of brown, yellow and grey.

Drinking Heavily in the Homeland of Scotch

Lessons in Whisky, the Muse of Scotland

Robert Burns once wrote: "Oh thou, my Muse! guid auld Scotch drink; / Inspire me till I lisp and wink / To sing thy name!" Judging from our drinking experiences in Scotland, he was probably lit as hell when he penned it.

2,000 Acres, A Restored Farmhouse and a Genius Madman Owner

Getting the Best of the Highlands at Monachyle Mhor

We were sitting in the dining room eating a breakfast of black pudding when Tom Lewis, owner, manager and head chef of Monachyle Mhor, burst in waving an enormous mushroom. Lewis is Welsh and moved to Scotland as a teen; I couldn't understand a damn word he said.

A Good Rummage Is Hard to Find

Postcard: Glasgow’s Barras Market

The Glasgow Barrowland Market, aka Barras Market, was meant to be a destination, a must-see stop our tour of Glasgow, the gem of the East End. We found something slightly different.

A Scotland Travel Guide

The Right to Roam: Day 2

Welcome to our sprawling travel journal of Scotland's environmental, cultural and culinary riches. Over the next two weeks we'll be sharing our collection of 50 essays, videos, anecdotes, photo essays, travel guides, recipes, poetry and tall tales gathered during one hell of a trip. Day Two features two searches in Glasgow: one for great craft beer, and one for a mythical nightlife scene.

A Scotland Travel Guide

The Right to Roam

Welcome to our sprawling travel journal of Scotland's environmental, cultural and culinary riches. Over the next two weeks we'll be sharing our collection of 50 essays, videos, anecdotes, photo essays, travel guides, recipes, poetry and tall tales gathered during one hell of a trip. The journey begins now.

An Adventurer's Breakfast

Postcard: Full Scottish Breakfast

I go to bed each night thinking: I’ve eaten plenty, and tomorrow I’ll have a light, healthy breakfast. Yet here I am, eating my third or fourth full Scottish in as many days.

A Scottish Adventure

Seeking the Right To Roam

The Freedom to Roam, unburdened of fences and posted signs, angry landowners and angrier guard dogs, is a shared dream among adventurers. Scotland codified it in 2003. Within guidelines for respectful use, recreational or educational, that means any Joe Scot can bring a backpack, a tent, a friend and a six pack and saunter cross-country, going where they please among the nation's 30,000 square miles -- many of them unpopulated, all of them free of any major predators besides the biting midges that emerge during the summer months. This sounded romanticized. So we set out to test it.