1984 Ferrari 288 GTO

Specs

Year: 1984
Type: 2-seat berlinetta
Engine: twin turbo V8
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Horsepower: 400
Top Speed: 189 mph

It’s the one that all newbies misidentify as a run-of-the-mill 308. Big mistake. It is, by all accounts, Ferrari’s first supercar, and it was bonkers for its time. Beautifully penned by Pininfarina, the GTO uses composite materials in its wide, low-slung body. Big quad driving lights, flared fenders and vents echo the forefather 250 GTO. It was built for Group B homologation, but due to high demand, Ferrari exceeded the required 200-car production quota by 72. All of the road cars were purchased before they were even made. The GTO’s 3-liter twin-turbo V8 pushed it past the 186 mph mark, making it the fastest production car in the world. It just also happened to be marvelous to look at; witnessing one in the flesh is a sight you’ll never forget.

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta

Specs

Year: 1964
Type: 2-seat berlinetta
Engine: V12
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Horsepower: 280
Top Speed: 160 mph

Yellow definitely isn’t synonymous with Ferrari, but the 275 GTB/4 in yellow is worthy of the name. Unveiled at the 1966 Paris Motor Show, the 275 GTB/4 was a breathtaking rightful successor to the 250, with a wide eggcrate grille leading to a long flat hood, and three sets of shark-gill vents punctuating its simple profile. Ferrari’s first production car, with four overhead camshafts on a 3.3-liter V12 engine (300 horsepower), was a GT car that was just as fast as it was beautiful. Though it isn’t as dramatic as the 250, it’s still viewed as one of Ferrari’s most elegantly designed cars.

1967 Dino 206 GT

Specs

Year: 1967
Type: 2-seat berlinetta
Engine: V6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Horsepower: 180
Top Speed: 146 mph

This small “Ferrari” just gets more and more popular. Despite its initial sales struggles due to the Dino (not Ferrari) badging, it was both wonderfully nimble and uniquely designed. It was, in fact, Ferrari’s first lower-displacement small sports car created to increase sales, and it won over prospective owners once they got behind the wheel. It has a low-slung sort of look, with its flat duckbill front end and its sloping tail, but with its curved front fenders and thin side vents, it exudes the same elegance that befits more expensive stallions. And now that purists have accepted it as a true Ferrari, the Dino is all the more desirable. Even when Enzo went econo, he could do no wrong.

1962 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta

Specs

Year: 1962
Type: 2-seat berlinetta
Engine: V12
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Horsepower: 240
Top Speed: 149 mph

Those who know the Ferrari 250 GT Lusso simply call it the Berlinetta Lusso. Unlike many other Ferraris of its period, the Lusso was not initially created for racing. Compared to the 250 GT Berlinetta, it’s far more lush, with more interior space and luxury appointments, and an upscale cabin that marked a welcome departure from the more hard-edged, racing-minded Ferraris. It was clearly a gentleman’s car — so much so that Steve McQueen bought one for himself.

1959 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Coupé Speciale

Specs

Year: 1959
Type: 2-seat berlinetta
Engine: V12
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Horsepower: 340
Top Speed: 174 mph

Ferrari’s first 400 Superamerica looked less like a Ferrari and more like an thick Russian limo. Fiat wanted something different, so Pininfarina premiered this unique three-box Ferrari at the 1959 Salon de Torino in Coupé Speciale, built especially for Fiat boss Gianni Agnelli with a 340 horsepower V12 engine. It was boxy and beautiful in ways other sleeker Ferraris could never match, sporting a tall rectangular grille, chrome headlights and a thin chrome bumper, and a tall greenhouse with a schmaltzy wraparound windshield. Most folks would never recognize it as a true Ferrari — but that’s precisely what makes it so unique.

1976 Ferrari 512 BB

Specs

Year: 1976
Type: 2-seat berlinetta
Engine: V12
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Horsepower: 360
0-60: 5.5 seconds
Top Speed: 187 mph

The 512 BB looks small, but it’s a serious driving machine. The mid-engine car is a true Berlinetta Boxer, sporting a 5-liter 12-cylinder engine with two banks of 6 horizontally opposed cylinders. Pininfarina’s coachwork outclassed the 365 GT4/BB it replaced, with a sharp front end that barely peaks over the front fender wells, making for an incredibly sleek body. Safety and function are understated, though present in a simple front bumper and a small, low-set NACA duct; but the stark, protruding black engine cover housings and massive rear tires add a perfect touch of menace.

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