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The 6-Series GT Is Another Swing and a Miss for BMW


Cars By Photo by BMW
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Forget the extra cargo space, the increased passenger headroom, or BMW’s claim that the new 6-Series Grand Turismo is “the ideal setting for a relaxing journey.” What I want to know is how BMW can release the 6-Series Gran Turismo so soon after a car that looks like the M8. It’s as if BMW is trying to wean crossover lovers off the crossover by making a sedan that looks like a crossover from the wheel arches up. Which is good, but the approach is all wrong.

BMW describing the new 6-Series GT as having “sporting elegance” is like saying a guinea pig is an athletic animal — it’s just not true. This type of car is an attempt to please everyone on paper, but on the road, it looks like a compromise from every angle. There’s nothing wrong with sloped roof lines on sedans, but a brand’s design language has to be there to support that kind of “coupe-styling” architecture. Audi’s done it, and with a fair amount of success, with the A7 and A5 Sportback sedans. BMW, on the other hand, does not have the same supportive design language. The current Bimmer lines, curves and cuts make for great-looking sedans and even SUVs, but not for whatever the 6-Series GT is supposed to be.

It took Porsche two attempts to get the 911 styling to fit on the Panamera, and now it’s one of the better-looking sedans on the road.
So maybe if BMW keeps trying to make its own version of the Honda Crosstour happen, it will eventually come into its own. But as it stands now, the 6-Series GT doesn’t come off as Bavaria’s best work.

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