You Can't Fit Much Else Anyway

An Ex-Government Land Rover is All the Defender You’ll Ever Need


November 1, 2018 Cars By
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There’s no doubt about it: overlanding is an expensive (read: addictive) hobby. Sure, you can walk into a dealership and get a bone stock Jeep Wrangler, or if you live across the Atlantic, a Land Rover Defender, and take on a trail right after you sign the papers. But most off-road enthusiasts will tell you that’s only the beginning. Next thing you know, you’re shopping for a roof rack; then it’s beefier off-road tires because you need those; then it’s a light bar and an extendable awning; then it’s a suspension lift — see where I’m going with this? By the end of it, you can easily spend just as much on modifications and add-ons as you did the truck itself. Or you could save time and money and get this ex-government Defender 110 which already has all the things you could want and need on an overlander.

This 1992 Land Rover 110 did a stint with the Turkish government ministry, but it’s the second owner who added the extra goodies — government budgets probably limited any good upgrades. Up front, the 2.4-liter Ford Duratorq turbodiesel inline-four puts power through a five-speed manual transmission and a Range Rover classic rear differential to BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A tires sitting on a 2-inch Terrafirma lift kit. Up top, a full-length roof rack, snorkel, roof-mounted awning and light bar complete the overlander look. Inside this Defender gets a few luxuries you won’t usually see in a stock farmhand Defender like a digital HVAC, reverse camera and leather seats and dash. You also get ARB air lockers, rock sliders and a skid plate up front.

With all those modifications considered, not to mention that it’s an imported left-hand drive model from Europe, at the time of this writing, at $16,000 this ’92 Landie is an absolute steal. Most importantly, it’s more than ready to hit any trail you can throw at it for no extra cost.

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