A Powder Hound's Paradise

The 17 Best Gifts for Skiers


December 15, 2018 Buying Guides By

Given the amount of gear needed for a full day of riding chairlifts in the cold and careening down a mountain, skiers are easy people to shop for. They beat the hell out of their gear, and chances are they’ll need something new going into winter. The list goes far deeper than skis too (although those are very important) — base layers, après footwear and snacks are all appropriate and appreciated.

Black Diamond Boundary Pro 107 Ski

Having a pair of versatile skis to handle a variety of conditions is how serious skiers optimize time on the hill. Black Diamond’s Boundary Pro 107 Skis are pro-approved big-mountain freeride skis with increased torsional stiffness for aggressive, powerful skiing. The Austrian-made skis are constructed with pre-preg fiberglass and a poplar wood core for big lines and high speeds in just about any sort of snow.

Blackstrap Hood Balaclava

In cold weather, a balaclava is essential. But it can also be cumbersome beneath a helmet and goggles. Blackstrap makes its Hood as low-profile as possible with a fabric blend that protects from the sun (and unwanted odors). But the best part is the articulating design that lets you pull it down off your face without scrunching up everything else.

UnTapped Organic Maple Waffles

No skier will ever opt for a frozen energy bar when UnTapped’s delicious maple-infused stroopwafel is available as an alternative. It’s made with organic flour, pure Vermont maple syrup and sugar, and sustainably-produced palm fruit oil.

Dissent Ski GFX Compression Hybrid Protect Sock

Skiers need to take their feet seriously; not just any sock will do — certainly not a cotton crew that comes in a pack of 12. Dissent knew this and designed its ski sock with targeted compression for optimal blood flow in mind (read: it’ll keep your toes warm).

Teva Ember Moc

There’s nothing like sliding out of cramped ski boots and into toasty slippers at the end of the day. Teva’s Ember Mocs have a grippy rubber sole that can handle all the snow and slush the resort can throw at them, so you don’t have to wait to get home for that moment.

Patagonia Capilene Air Bottoms

Patagonia’s Capilene Air Base Layers are constructed with a seam-free 3D knit that blends polyester and merino wool in a sweater-like pattern that’s optimized for warmth and breathability in a wide range of temperatures. Long johns have never been comfier.

Oyuki The Pep Trigger Mitts

Oyuki designs its gloves to handle the never-ending blizzards of Hokkaido, and it worked with pro skier Pep Fujas to make something that’ll function around the world. Chances are, it’ll work anywhere the skier in your life plans to go.

The North Face Snowmad 34 Pack

Backcountry skiers have a unique set of tools that they need to haul up and down remote peaks. They need backpacks designed especially for carrying a shovel and probe as well as additional layers, snacks and of course, skis.

POC Obex SPIN Helmet

POC’s latest safety tech is called SPIN, and it consists of a series of gel-like pads that comfortably line the inside of a helmet and help negate the effects of multi-directional impacts. It’s best applied in the Obex — the little skull protectors are barely noticeable.

Db Equipment Douchebag Snow Roller Ski Bag

Despite its name, this ski bag is no joke. It can fit two pairs of skis along with lots of other gear and uses a unique strap system that converts its volume to fit ski lengths as long as 205 centimeters. Best of all, it rolls up into a compact bundle that’ll fit comfortably in a closet or under a bed when ski season ends.

Smith I/O Mag Goggles

Smith was first on the scene with its interchangeable lens goggles, so it was a bit of a surprise that it took so long for the company to get into magnets. But it’s a good thing that Smith took its time, because the I/O Mag is exceptional, and can be relied upon by skiers who want to be prepared for any light condition.

Kuat Grip Ski Rack

Keep slush out of your car. Kuat, a company well known for its bike racks, just made an easier way to throw skis on top of any rig with an easy-to-install ski rack that includes a slide-out tray.

Picture Zephir Jacket

Picture gets that skiers need powder skirts, taped seams, wrist guards and blizzard-worthy waterproof fabrics. But it also knows that they want lots of pockets, a slightly loose fit and a nifty curved zipper that gives your chin a little extra breathing room.

Backcountry x Flylow Mill D Bib Pant

Backcountry took 22 years of customer service intel only a gear retailer can have and used it to team up with Flylow and create an awesome pair of bibs. They’re super light, waterproof, breathable and include never-before-created features, like a strap for securing climbing skins beneath your jacket.

Mammut Barryvox S Beacon

An avalanche beacon is a required article for backcountry exploration. Mammut’s latest is for the most serious of that group and comes with the most technologically advanced feature set available in a beacon (it includes a 70-meter range and a smart search mode). But it’s fit for beginners who are just starting to wander beyond resort boundaries too.

Salomon S/LAB Shift MNC Binding

Salomon figured out how to make a touring binding that goes downhill as well as it goes up; it’s essentially two bindings in one, and perfect for the skier who only wants to own one pair of skis.

Dynafit Hoji Pro Tour Ski Boot

Developed with professional skier Eric “Hoji” Hjorleifson over four years, Dynafit’s latest boot is a lightweight touring boot that achieves the performance capabilities of a downhill boot. Its highly-engineered lock system uses a single lever that transitions the boot from walk mode to downhill mode, and the goal achieved is simplicity; no more messing around with buckles and switches, just one, easy-to-access lever.

Holiday Gift Guide 2018

Don’t know what to get the people on your list? We’ve got you covered with our holiday gift guide.

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