This Year in Gear

25 of the Best Bike Products That Came Out in 2019


January 1, 2020 Sports and Outdoors By

This roundup is part of This Year in Gear, a look back at the year’s most notable releases. To stay on top of all the latest product news, subscribe to our daily Dispatch newsletter.

Time Osmos

Price: $200+
From: amazon.com

Time’s new collection of cycling shoes is called Osmos, and it includes three models. Each is built based on a concept of bioperformance, which looks at how the different parts of the body move most efficiently while on a bike.

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Trek WaveCel

Price: $150+
From: trekbikes.com

WaveCel is the newest entry into a recent elaboration helmet technologies designed to protect against angular impacts, which make up most if not all crashes.

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Enve 3.4 AR

Price: $2,550
From: competitivecyclist.com

Enve’s latest wheelset combines its AR (All Road) width rim bed with a low profile, wide, and lightweight rim set to offer a wheel that performs well uphill and down, as well as in crosswinds.

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Specialized Roubaix

Price: $2,900+
From: specialized.com

What sets the Roubaix apart from other bikes is Future Shock, a technology that Specialized introduced in previous model years to provide a smoother ride over varied terrain.

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Orucase B2

Price: $599
From: orucase.com

Bike baggage fees have spiked in recent years, so Orucase designed an innovative bike travel case that’s below the maximum dimensions that most airlines use to classify a standard bag.

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Velocio Recon Micromodal Jersey

Price: $139
From: velocio.com

A form-fitting jersey made from the same material as those ultra-soft boxers that you love.

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Ortlieb Atrack BP

Price: $265
From: backcountry.com

Ortlieb’s original Atrack won numerous awards. Now the brand is slimming it down and adding some cycling-specific features to appeal to the bikepacking crowd.

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Diamondback Sync’r Carbon

Price: $3,000
From: diamondback.com

Diamondback has made a name for itself in producing quality mountain bikes at an approachable price point. The Sync’r is a carbon hardtail (a mountain bike without rear suspension), and it offers modern geometry, plus-sized tires, a 1×12 gearing and a quality fork — all for $3,000.

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Garmin Edge 530 and 830

Price: $33+
From: garmin.com

In addition to new safety features like group messaging, tracking and built-in incident detection, Garmin’s new bike computers work with Trailforks, a platform that monitors trail conditions and lets mountain bikers share their rides.

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Wahoo Elemnt Roam

Price: $380
From: rei.com

As its name implies, the Roam adds a handful of key navigational features to the system that Wahoo employs in its other computers.

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State Bicycles 4130 Road

Price: $550
From: statebicycle.com

At $550, State Bicycle Co.’s first bike with gears is affordable, and at just under 23 pounds, it’s light enough to lug into elevators and up staircases.

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Cannondale Treadwell

Price: $950
From: rei.com

Cannondale designed all the elements of its new commuter to make biking, whether to and from work or around the neighborhood on the weekend, simpler.

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Specialized Demo 29

Price: $2,500+
From: specialized.com

Specialized put in years of development, collecting feedback from pro riders as well as plenty of data, and redesigned the Demo with a new chassis, frame geometry and suspension to make it as fast as possible.

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Sklar Bikes Sweet Spot

Price: $2,850
From: sklarbikes.com

Adam Sklar is renowned in the bike industry for his curvy steel and titanium frames. Sklar typically makes custom mountain bikes, but he recently revealed the Sweet Spot, his first-ever stock geometry production model.

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Velocio Concept Collection

Price: $189+
From: velocio.com

Velocio utilized top-line fabrics and body-mapped construction to make clothing that’s as aerodynamic and comfortable as possible.

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Yeti SB140

Price: $5,399+
From: yeticycles.com

The SB140, which comes in five builds (XS to XL) plus a frame-only option, and uses Yeti’s tried-and-true Switch Infinity slider, which makes the bike feel like its suspension is infinite, even when you’re pushing past the edges of your comfort zone.

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Giro Tyrant

Price: $170
From: amazon.com

The Tyrant is a full-cut helmet that covers the ears but doesn’t include a chin bar.

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Vintage Electric Roadster

Price: $6,995
From: vintageelectric.com

You can pedal the Roadster like a bike, or you can thumb the throttle and go up to 36 miles per hour.

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Electra Townie Go! 7D

Price: $1,500
From: rei.com

While e-bikes are the way of the future for commuters (and possibly mountain bikers), the problem of price remains. California-based bike brand Electra wants to fix that with its newest commuter e-bike, the Townie Go! 7D.

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Specialized Enduro

Price: $3,200
From: specialized.com

All the tweaks in the new Enduro contribute to its ability to take on big obstacles, like rocks and roots, without bucking. Result? Fewer bumps, less braking, more speed.

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Rad Power Bikes RadRunner

Price: $1,299
From: radpowerbikes.com

The RadRunner is explicitly utilitarian; its modular construction allows for the addition of a range of accessories, such as a center console storage compartment or a rear bin. There’s also a passenger seat option that turns the bike into a would-be moped.

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Pivot Phoenix 29

Price: $3,799+
From: backcountry.com

A full carbon frame makes use of Pivot’s proprietary molding technology to weigh just 6.4 pounds while remaining incredibly sturdy.

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Specialized Torch 1.0

Price: $100
From: specialized.com

Specialized’s new Torch 1.0 contains many of the features that you’ll find on the best cycling shoes available but is only $100, a stark contrast to bike footwear that can cost $400 or more.

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Rapha Gore-Tex Collection

Price: $295+
From: rapha.com

Rapha, a company renowned for its high-quality cycling garments, teamed up with Gore-Tex, perhaps the biggest name in waterproof fabrics, to create a line of on-bike outerwear meant for the worst weather imaginable.

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Abbey Bike Tools Team Issue Toolbox

Price: $1,350
From: abbeybiketools.com

Abbey Bike Tools doesn’t produce all of the tools needed for bike maintenance, so it filled out the rest of this treasure chest with the best it could source from other companies.

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The 10 Best Fitness Products of 2019

Fitness isn’t always what you’d call fun. Which is why we love any product that brings us one step closer to that elusive feeling. Like this stuff. Read the Story

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