Features

Your Guide to Getting Outside

25 Best American Microadventures

Microadventures don't take excessive amounts of time or money. They also don't take excuses. Here are the 25 best trips to slip into your summer plans.

Summer Preview 2015
The Story of Kodak Motion Picture Film

Film Is Not Dead

Why do some filmmakers still shoot on film? We followed the film from Kodak's headquarters to the big screen to find out.

Film Issue
Developing Good Character

The Way Things Age

Documenting how the things we use take on our patina over the years.

Judging Beer by Its Cover

The Most Iconic Craft Beer Labels, and Their Stories

Who designs your favorite craft beer labels and cans? What inspires them, and how do they translate great beer into expressive, convincing art? To find out, we asked brewers, artists, experts and designers at several major breweries.

Beer Week
In Craft We Trust

The State of American Craft Beer

Craft beer faces a whole new set of hurdles in 2015. Where are we headed as a nation of brewers and drinkers?

Beer Week
Visiting a Great Explorer

Will Steger Is a Force of Nature

Polar explorer Will Steger knows dark and cold better than anyone. But he wants to show people the light.

The North Journal
The Rise of Ed Schoenfeld

The Man Behind New York’s Best Chinese Food

Ed Schoenfeld of RedFarm and Decoy is serving up what Zagat calls the best Chinese food in New York City. He invited us for lunch to photograph his home and pantry.

More Than Audio-Enabled Earmuffs

The Pitch-Perfect Legacy of Joseph Grado

Joseph Grado, who died at the age of 90 earlier this month, took his watchmaker skills to handmade audio cartridges, turntable tone arms, and headphones at Grado Labs.

Single Malt, Many Virtues

Can Americans Make Single Malt as Well as the Scots?

In 2012, an American single malt whiskey from Balcones Distillery in Texas defeated nine other world-class single malts from around the world and gained international attention. Today, the American version of Scotch is still booming, reinforced by a number of new distilleries.

25 Best Places to Travel in 2015

The Adventure List

Travel is the desire to be changed -- to go, engage in a place, assimilate into its rhythms and quirks, and return home with its fragrant intoxication still swirling around in the brain. For 2015, these places are where we want to be changed.

2015 Travel Issue
A portrait of a changing beach town

Sunset in Montauk

In the last decade of summers, more and more tourists have pushed farther down Long Island until, invariably, they've arrived at its end: the little town of Montauk. With increased tourism comes money, but for many in Montauk, it also brings a yearly headache of inebriated vacationers, rising rent prices, congested beaches and changing culture in between harsh, wasteland-like winters. We set out to Montauk to talk to six locals -- a policeman, a teacher, a surfer, a scenester, a fisherman and a retiree -- about why and how Montauk is changing.

Digging Up History on the Kalaupapa Peninsula

Finding the “Real” Hawaii in Molokai’s Leper Colony

There I was, coming down the mountain like a kid on a playground, happy to finally be in the “real Hawaii”, and all of a sudden I realized that I’d arrived at a leper colony -- one where people still lived.

In the Woods with Dad on a January Deer Hunt

Fresh Tracks, Flintlock Rifles

Trying to kill venison in wintry north Pennsylvania is hard. Doing it with a weapon invented 400 years ago can be an exercise in futility. But there's also no better reminder that hunting is about much more than just bagging game.

Sportsman Issue
Disagreement and an Endangered Climb

The End of Ayers Rock?

Ayers Rock, a huge, flat sandstone summit in the middle of the Australian desert, draws huge crowds. But part of that tourism involves climbing over ground that the Anangu tribe, the owners of the land, consider sacred.

Feature
Wreck diving the cold waters around Isle Royale

Expedition Royale

This summer, GP's Jason Heaton set out to dive five of Lake Superior's most notable wrecks.

The North Journal
Notes from a WWII POW

My Grandfather’s War

GP writer Bryan Campbell's grandfather became a prisoner of war during WWII's Battle of the Bulge. He was imprisoned for just over four months. Here is a glimpse of his experience from his personal journal, 70 years to the day of his capture.

Don't Call It Napa 2.0

New York’s Finger Lakes Wine Finds Its Way

At long last, New York's Finger Lakes wine region is gaining recognition, both nationally and abroad. Can the community preserve its identity in the face of looming challenges?

Uncorked
The Pros and Cons of Abandoning Europe's Hiking Hut System

Hiking the Alps, Sans Huts

Dan had mentioned his novel idea before our summer trip to Switzerland: we’d go backpacking, in the Alps -- no huts. Bring your sleeping bags and bivy sacks, he said. Brilliant, I thought.

YES and NO, in their words

Months After Rejected Independence, A New Kind of Scottish Unity

The people of Scotland had a chance to gain independence from the United Kingdom in 2014: all it would take was a majority popular vote. They voted against it. Answers to why, and what the declined offer means for the country, are different for every Scot.

The Scotland Issue
A Scotland Travel Guide

The Right to Roam: Day 2

Welcome to our sprawling travel journal of Scotland's environmental, cultural and culinary riches. Over the next two weeks we'll be sharing our collection of 50 essays, videos, anecdotes, photo essays, travel guides, recipes, poetry and tall tales gathered during one hell of a trip. Day Two features two searches in Glasgow: one for great craft beer, and one for a mythical nightlife scene.

The Scotland Issue
Worldly Brews from the Scottish Craft Scene

The Best Microbrews in Scotland

Finding the best craft brews in Scotland with the help of Glasgow's DryGate Brewery.

The Scotland Issue
New Hops, Fine Water and Malt, and a Big Wave of Creativity

The Rise of Scottish Craft Beer

Scottish craft beer is in its infancy. But its brewers are pushing new boundaries, using complex hops from around the world to launch a glut of creativity.

The Scotland Issue
A Scotland Travel Guide

The Right to Roam

Welcome to our sprawling travel journal of Scotland's environmental, cultural and culinary riches. Over the next two weeks we'll be sharing our collection of 50 essays, videos, anecdotes, photo essays, travel guides, recipes, poetry and tall tales gathered during one hell of a trip. The journey begins now.

Scotland Travel Guide
The search for answers around Bourbon's resurrection

Why Is Bourbon Booming?

We've been making a lot of noise lately about our shitshow of an adventure in Kentucky. We got a team of three together, flew to Kentucky, ate great food, drank at the local bars, sometimes too much, interviewed the new and the old of bourbon -- politicians, brewers, drinkers -- you name it, we tried do it.

The Bourbon Issue
Canada Hops on the Craft Bandwagon

Learning from the Small-Batch Bourbon Boom

Forty Creek's John K. Hall tells the tale of how American bourbon showed Canadian whiskey the way from counterfeit hooch to finely crafted whiskey.

The Bourbon Issue
A Video Tour of the Process from 12 Bourbon Distilleries

How Bourbon Is Made

We toured 12 distilleries in a five-day blitz, asking everyone we met to walk us through the bourbon-making process. Here, you'll find all of the steps that go into making America's unique take on whiskey.

The Bourbon Issue
Single barrel bourbon explained

Hand Selecting Barrels with Chris Morris of Woodford Reserve

“For liquor stores, whiskey bars, restaurants -- having a private barrel label is basically their way of saying ‘This is how we like our whiskey.’” Tom Fischer, the founder of BourbonBlog and a frequent judge at many spirits and cocktail competitions, told me over the phone after we got back from Kentucky. “So it allows them to put that bottle on a shelf and say, you know, ‘This is something we went to Kentucky and we picked up. This is how we like our whiskey, but it may not always be how you like it.’” We shadowed Seattle-based Duke's Chowder House as they selected their own personal barrel of Woodford Reserve Double Oaked.

The Bourbon Issue
Gleaning the Importance of the Family Tree

Buffalo Trace’s Hunt for the Perfect Bourbon

"Buffalo Trace is already making the bourbons of the future”, said our guide Freddy Johnson. It sounded bold until we stopped to think about it. Whiskey has to age before it can qualify as bourbon, so technically, every distiller is making “the bourbons of the future” today. Still, after we spent an afternoon learning about the company’s quest to make the world’s perfect bourbon, his phrasing seemed prophetic.

The Bourbon Issue
A Complete Guide to a (Worthy) Legend

Demystifying Pappy Van Winkle

I'd say that Pappy Van Winkle is a brand that needs no introduction, except that it does. The truth is that most people don’t know anything about “Pappy,” other than that it’s supposed to be the best of its kind. So let’s set the record straight by getting a couple of basic facts out of the way.

The Bourbon Issue
How a next-generation master distiller helped relight the stills

Willett’s Long Path Back to Bourbon

Willett Master Distiller Drew Kulsveen doesn't have time for bullshit. It's not something he has to tell anyone. The message shoots from his eyes like a railgun. Even at a relatively young age, it's clear he's heard it all before. He talks like someone who’s lost years listening to others dribble on, and worked hard to eradicate the behavior in himself; his speech is terse, verging on curt. You can't blame him for him ignoring the noise. A lot rides on his shoulders. He and his family worked for years to rebuild the family distillery, which reopened in 2012, and now he's determined to prove a point.

The Bourbon Issue
Inside Louisville's Copper & Kings Distillery

Making Brandy in Bourbon Country

A stack of freshly painted neon orange and black shipping containers stand in stark contrast to the red brick warehouse aesthetic of East Washington Street in the Butchertown area of Louisville, like a shiny new Google campus in the middle of a housing project. The large steel rectangles are the first of many signs that the Copper & Kings distillery is anything but traditional.

The Bourbon Issue

While You're Here

Get the best new products, deals, and stories from across the world, in your inbox daily. ✉