There are men, and then there are men. As one of most prominent statesmen of the 20th century, Winston Churchill easily defines the second category. Churchill is well known for his contributions to British (and world) history as the Prime Minister who willed the Limeys through WWII. His life and contributions have been accordingly documented by various and sundry publications.

Largely though, writers have used historical, political and military context in their musings on the British Bulldog. Barry Singer, in his book Churchill Style: The Art of Being Winston Churchill ($15), takes an alternate and rewarding route. So many books on Churchill have breezed over the man’s fascinating personality — when told he could not end sentences with prepositions in a speech, he supposedly quipped “This is the sort of tedious nonsense up with which I will not put!” — in favor of the perhaps more concrete public image and timeline. Singer places Churchill’s quirks and style at the forefront, examining Churchill’s particular tastes in autos, books, cigars, dining, fashion, home, libations and pastimes. What better way to create a stunning read than to profile the personal aspects of a man who, after inviting FDR into his audience while stark naked, simply said, “You see Mr. President, I have nothing to hide from you!” For a man such as Churchill, Singer’s approach provides us with entertainment as well as a grass-roots understanding of the historic figure we know.

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