From Issue Three of the Gear Patrol Magazine.
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The Hudson Valley, divided by its namesake river, encompasses more than 7,000 square miles between New York City and Albany. Many visit for the history; the region’s score of worn stone houses date back as far as the early 1700s. Others journey more plainly, simply seeking seclusion and tranquility in the eastern Catskills. Regardless, all travel to the Hudson Valley is driven by the same quiet search for the rare, the weird, the wonderful. Here’s where to start.

Where to Eat & Drink

Where Farm Meets Table
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Blue Hill at Stone Barns
Chef Dan Barber highlights the local and seasonal produce of upstate New York through provocative, yet delicious, tasting menus. Many of the ingredients come from the restaurant’s surrounding farm, fields and pastures.

Location: 630 Bedford Rd, Pocantico Hills | Learn More: bluehillfarm.com

Fish & Game
Zakary Pelaccio, who rose to prominence at Fatty Crab in New York City, opened Fish & Game in 2013 to focus on farm-to-table American fare. Three years later, his work here won him the James Beard Award for Best Chef in the Northeast.

Location: 13 S 3rd St, Hudson | Learn More: fishandgamehudson.com

Phoenicia Diner
This unassuming eatery on State Road 28, a short drive beyond Woodstock and aglitter with mid-’60s chrome and hanging globe lights, is a step back in time. Now run by a Brooklynite, the food goes beyond your standard diner fare — think breakfast tacos, crab-cake BLTs and the best chocolate milkshake in town.

Location: 5681 NY-28, Phoenicia | Learn More: phoeniciadiner.com

Industrial Arts Brewing Co.
Esteemed brewer Jeff O’Neill opened Industrial Arts Brewing Co. in the summer of 2016 in Garnerville, a small hamlet in Rockland County. His focus is on quaffable ales that don’t sacrifice their elegance or their complexity.

Location: 55 W Railroad Ave #25, Garnerville | Learn More: industrialartsbrewing.com

What to Do

Alternative Culture
PHOTO BY LINDSAY CARLSON

PHOTO BY LINDSAY CARLSON

Dia:Beacon
Dia:Beacon pioneered the renovation of industrial spaces for art shows when it opened in 2003. With 160,000 square feet at its disposal, the space lends itself to large-scale exhibitions, which focus primarily on contemporary art after 1960.

Location: 3 Beekman St, Beacon | Learn More: diaart.org

Manitoga
The former estate of designer Russel Wright (famous for his iconic tableware line, American Modern), Manitoga encompasses 75 acres of gardens, waterfalls and pristine hiking trails. Now open to the public, it was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 2006.

Location: 584 NY-9D, Garrison | Learn More: visitmanitoga.org

Storm King Art Center
This open-air museum, an hour’s drive from New York City, spans 500 acres and includes sculptures from renowned 20th-century artists such as Alexander Calder, Richard Serra and Isamu Noguchi.

Location: 1 Museum Rd, New Windsor | Learn More: stormking.org

Basilica Hudson
Founded in 2010, Basilica Hudson hosts a steady stream of offbeat events, including Farm & Flea and the music and art festival Basilica SoundScape.

Location: 110 S Front St, Hudson | Learn More: basilicahudson.org

Where to Stay

Boutique Hotels and Vintage Inns
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Rivertown Lodge
A renovated movie theater from the 1920s nestled at the far end of Warren Street, Hudson’s main drag. There are 27 rooms, each outfitted with brass light fixtures and custom-made beds from the Brooklyn design firm Workstead.

Location: 731 Warren St, Hudson | Learn More: rivertownlodge.com

Foxfire Mountain House
This 11-room bed-and-breakfast is housed in a 100-year-old inn that’s been refurbished with Moroccan tiles and sun-bleached bed frames. It caters to the modern creative looking to explore the Catskills during a cozy weekend in the country.

Location: 72 Andrew Ln, Mt Tremper | Learn More: foxfiremountainhouse.com

Hasbrouck House
Formerly known as the Inn at Stone Ridge, the newly renovated Hasbrouck House is a stone mansion built in 1757. The rooms feature writing desks and fireplaces, though half the reason to come is for the adjacent farm-to-table restaurant, Butterfield.

Location: 3805 US-209, Stone Ridge | Learn More: hasbrouckhouseny.com

Audrey’s Farmhouse
This 18th-century farmhouse-turned-bed-and-breakfast near the foot of the Shawangunk Ridge has only five rooms. It’s pet-friendly and has plenty of room out back for yard games and relaxing by the fire pit.

Location: 2188 Bruynswick Rd, Wallkill | Learn More: audreysfarmhouse.com
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A version of this story appears in Issue Three of the Gear Patrol Magazine, 320 pages of stories, reports, interviews and original photography from five distinct locations around the world. Subscribe Now: $39