snake-river-gear-patrol-badgeSteak is personal. People that eat it, love it; they tend to be highly opinionated, preferring specific cuts, seasonings (or a lack thereof) and methods of preparation. That’s why we asked you, our readers, to guide us across America in search of the nation’s best steaks, from weighty T-bones and tender ribeyes to saucy steaks au poivre, laced in heavy cream and black pepper. To top it all off, our friends at Snake River Farms are giving away $600 worth of America’s finest Kobe beef to celebrate our juicy Meat Issue. Congrats Greg S. from Minneapolis, Minnesota: fire up your grill, because you took home the prize.

For those who submitted, thank you. Collectively you reminded us that this is a country that loves its steak and isn’t at all shy about it. If you didn’t win, chin up — your new favorite steak is probably just around the corner, served by one of the many fine establishments listed below. So here they are, selected by and for Gear Patrol readers: the best steaks in America.

Editor’s note: The following responses have been edited and condensed for clarity and length.

Our Winner

Lindey’s Prime Steak House, Arden Hills, MN

Lindey’s Special Sirloin: “Lindey’s Prime Steak House in Arden Hills, Minnesota, hasn’t changed since my grandpa first took my dad in the early 1960s. The wood-paneled interior, warped bar and stained rotary telephone behind the hostess all harken to a time before cuisine was ‘enhanced’ by foamed avocado, nitrogen-charged boysenberries or worries about cholesterol. My family goes every year for my old man’s birthday.

It is decidedly Minnesotan. The sloped parking lot always has a few vehicles that would have looked at home when the restaurant first opened its doors in 1958, and the classic cars remind us of the timeless quality produced by the vintage broilers inside. We take our seats next to the 60-year-old stone fireplace and prepare to order. In lieu of menus, the staff places a placard in front of the table with steak and shrimp options. For us, the procedure is unnecessary. “Four Lindey’s Special Sirloins, please!”

Before the main course comes the least pretentious salad in Minnesota — iceberg lettuce, a slice of tomato and thousand island dressing. Then the steak is rolled to the table on a stainless steel cart. It’s perfectly browned and juicy next to a side of what Lindey’s calls ‘greaseless hashbrowns,’ which look like hamburger buns cut into small squares, slathered with garlic butter and toasted. We grip our worn, wood-handled steak knives, and for the next 15 minutes conversation halts. Steak juice soaks into the hash browns, blood is wiped from chins, and a father-son bond is strengthened.

I’ve had better cuts of meat, seen fancier white tablecloths, and met bow-tied Maitre D’s. When asked, however, where to find the best steak in America, I say Lindey’s. Because if any meal speaks to tradition, it is a thick, juicy, perfectly browned steak enjoyed in the company of the people who mean the most to you.” — Greg S. (Minneapolis, MN)

3600 Snelling Ave N | (651) 633-9813 | theplaceforsteak.com

The List

Mister B’s Steakhouse, Rogers, AR

Ribeye: “Mister B’s is a quiet little steakhouse in Rogers, Arkansas — a small town in the Ozarks. The restaurant is an old house and you eat in the living room. Mrs. B sits up front to make sure you’re on the list for the night. The ribeye is tender, juicy, highly marbled and aged for at least ten days. It comes out simmering in a light pool of butter. They season it with salt and pepper, butter in the pan and a special mix of spices as it sears. It comes with some asparagus, a giant baked potato and two rolls from a local bakery.” — David J. (Fayetteville, AR)

1043 W Walnut St | (479) 636-3122 | misterbsteakhouse.net

Terroni, Los Angeles, CA

New York Bistecca: “Terroni is a sceney Italian restaurant, known for pizza and pasta offerings. But the Bistecca special is out of this world. It’s so simple: a bone-in, aged 21-ounce New York strip, rubbed in olive oil, dusted with salt and pepper, and grilled medium rare. It’s served on a large wooden plank with a very simple arugula salad, dressed in EVOO, balsamic and lemon juice, topped with giant Parmigiano-Reggiano shavings and sweet cherry tomatoes.” — A. P. (Los Angeles, CA)

802 S Spring St | (213) 221-7234 | terroni.com

Rare Italian Steakhouse, Fort Collins, CO

House-Aged Ribeye: “In picturesque downtown Fort Collins, Rare Italian Steakhouse has a modern, upscale feel with a great wine selection. Inside, it’s impossible to miss the clear meat locker where the restaurant stores its aged, locally sourced prime cuts. The house-aged ribeye, served medium rare and lightly seasoned, is the pinnacle of Colorado cattle. It is presented on a bed of arugula with a hint of lemon. The citrus does well in aiding the combination of mouth-watering flavors.” — Chase S. (Fort Collins, CO)

101 S College Ave | (970) 294-4544 | rareitalian.com

Prime Rib, Washington, D.C.

Prime Rib: “The Prime Rib is situated on K Street in Washington, D.C., and features dark velvet drapes, a completely ridiculous leopard-print carpet, white tablecloths and a jacket requirement. Every night a pianist plays while the tuxedo-clad waitstaff patrols the restaurant floor. There are plenty of cuts on the menu, but you’re here for one thing: prime rib. Dinner-plate sized and served just north of rare, it leaves a puddle of drippings behind. — Bryant (Washington, D.C.)

2020 K St NW | (202) 466-8811 | theprimerib.com
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Bern’s Steak House, Tampa, FL

Delmonico: “Bern’s isn’t just a steakhouse, it’s an experience. Steaks are available from one to three inches thick, and can be ordered from just-kissed-by-the-flame to broiled-to-a-dark-char. Each steak is served with amazing sides, from rich and delicious French onion soup to the perfect baked potato. The meal can be finished up in the dessert room (yes, they have a room just for dessert); choose from a long list of decadent homemade sweets and boozed-up coffee drinks.” — Chance C. (Houston, TX)

1208 S Howard Ave | (813) 251-2421 | bernssteakhouse.com

Archie’s Waeside, Le Mars, IA

The Benny: “Off menu, The Benny steak is something like a 24-ounce filet that’s aged in-house and seasoned simply, with salt, pepper, and third-generation restaurant owner Bob Rand’s special spice. For me, it’s the best meat in the country, served in a comfy small-town cafe that attracts steak-lovers from across the nation, including Boeing execs and Rachel Ray. Plus, Rand might know more about the Napa Valley than anyone in Napa Valley, so the wine list is chock full of gems.” — Joel T. (Sioux Falls, SD)

224 4th Ave NE | (712) 546-7011 | archieswaeside.com

Pioneer Saloon, Ketchum, ID

Cowboy Cut Rib Steak: “Steak is meant to be simple and delicious — there’s no need to drown it in sauce or choke it with seasoning. Especially here in Idaho, the Old West. A great steak doesn’t have to be served on a white tablecloth, accompanied by a Sommelier’s wine selection. It just has to be a great-tasting, perfectly cooked slab of beef in a place that makes you feel not only at home, but thankful to be alive and in that exact moment. The Pioneer Saloon does just that.” — Justin N. (Boise, ID)

320 N Main St | (208) 726-3139 | pioneersaloon.com

Scholars Inn Bakehouse & Catering, Bloomington, IN

Scholars Aged Filet Mignon: “I was 21, and this was the first proper steak I ever ordered. I sometimes wonder if I’ve since been chasing the feeling more than the dish. I’ve been back a few times since and each visit reminds me that while I may never be able to fully disentangle the nostalgia, it is a damn good steak — pure Indiana, served on a bed of macaroni and cheese. At medium rare, the steak is lightly salted, with a bit of steak sauce on the macaroni, leaving the meat to its own devices.” — Daniel H. (Indianapolis, IN)

125 N College Ave | 812-332-1892 | scholarsinn.com

Lewnes’ Steakhouse, Annapolis, MD

Filet Mignon: “Annapolis is America’s pirate town — it takes its cannons, sailboats, and rum seriously — but its best food doesn’t come from the sea. Steps from the Chesapeake Bay, the cramped, dimly lit quarters of Lewnes’ Steakhouse represent the timeless quality of the city. The filet mignon melts on your tongue and is so flavorful that you’ll become torn between the pleasure of each bite and patience to delay the inevitable, crushing sense of loss when it’s finished. The fries dipped in mashed potatoes are the only acceptable distraction.” — Nick R. (Los Altos, CA)

401 Fourth St | (410) 263-1617 | lewnessteakhouse.com
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Timber Steakhouse & Rotisserie, Portland, ME

Bone-In Ribeye: “This thing is a Fred Flintstone monster. If you can’t finish it, you can carry it home by its handle (a.k.a. the huge Frenched bone sticking out the side). Go medium rare to render out the marbling, and lather on the house steak sauce. Don’t forget to wipe off your mustache, and enjoy the lumber-themed interior, replete with what’s perhaps the biggest bourbon selection in Maine.” — Brian C. (Portland, ME)

106 Exchange St | (207) 805-1469 | timberportland.com

The Mulefoot Gastropub, Imlay City, MI

Filet Mignon with Crabapple Demi-Glace: “They start with an organic filet mignon, maybe 2.5 inches thick, seasoned with salt and pepper, and cooked over an open flame to medium rare. It comes with a crabapple demi-glace that includes duck stock, beet juice, and crabapples, reduced down with a sour cabbage mixture on top. I was disappointed when it was gone because I knew it would be another 680 miles, 10-hour round trip before I could enjoy it again.” — Dan M. (Streamwood, IL)

596 S Cedar St | (810) 721-1019 | themulefoot.com

2nd Street Bistro, Livingston, MT

Steak Frites: “This is locally grown YGB (Yellowstone Grassfed Beef Company). It’s a deconstructed sirloin, sliced thickly across the grain and served a true medium rare with frites and asparagus spears. The steak is the hero, perfectly cooked and unadorned — no fussy sauces or mustard with bourbon gimmicks. It’s just delicately seasoned, allowing the earthy umami to shine through. Every time I order it I am transported to eating with cowboys in a Magnificent Seven movie.” — Lance S. (Toronto, ON)

123 N 2nd St | (406) 222-9463 | secondstreetbistro.com

The Brooklyn Star, Brooklyn, NY

Pan-Roasted 28-Day Dry-Aged T-Bone: “This steak is the Platonic ideal of the American steak. The ‘Star Steak’ is special because it’s seasoned perfectly, and it’s served unpretentiously, in a real fucking pan, by a real fucking chef. It comes served with hand-cut russet fries, a grilled wedge salad and a bowl of marrow butter.” — Peter D. (Brooklyn, NY)

593 Lorimer St | (718) 599-9899 | thebrooklynstar.com

Peter Luger Steakhouse, Brooklyn, NY

Porterhouse for Two: “Peter Luger Steakhouse uses only the finest cuts of dry-aged beef, aged next door to the restaurant. The wood flooring, walls and tables give it an old-world feel with a focus on what matters: the steak. The porterhouse is seasoned with salt, and best when rare. Service is of course great, and you only need to ask to be ‘set up’ to get the standard fare done to perfection — no need to review a menu.”
— Christopher G. (Hoboken, NJ)

178 Broadway | (718) 387-7400 | peterluger.com
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The Cannibal, New York, NY

Dry-Aged Ribeye: “While the beer list is great, we’re here to talk about the steak, a 36-ounce, bone-in ribeye, dry-aged for 50 days so that the meat gains an earthy funk, but not so long as to lose its texture. It’s seared on the outside for a warm, smoky, crispy contrast to the rare, cool, almost purple center. While the garnish on the meat itself is limited to large flakes of salt (which is all it needs), the icing on the cake is the broiled bone marrow that melts like butter when spread over the half-inch-thick slices of meat.” — Eric A. (New York, NY)

113 E 29th St | (212) 686-5480 | cannibalnyc.com

Raoul’s, New York, NY

Steak Au Poivre: “The Steak Au Poivre is the signature dish of this SoHo staple; I’ve probably had it 20 times and it’s utterly consistent. It’s well marbled, perfectly trimmed and touched with a perfect amount of cracked pepper and au poivre sauce. Healthy portions of fries and watercress accompany it.” — James M. (New York, NY)

180 Prince St | (212) 966-3518 | raouls.com

Sir Scott’s Oasis Steakhouse & Lounge, Manhattan, MT

T-Bone Steak: “This is the T-bone steak that handshake deals are made over. It’s a steak that smells of wind-bent grass, snow-wrapped peaks and gloved hands on branding irons. A man’s steak. It’s seasoned with salt, pepper, and imbued with trust and guile, then served on stainless steel in a blackened wooden platter with a potato crowned by butter. The salad that leads is as inconsequential as olives in a martini — pretty, but not why we are here. We are here to take the gift of grass, to honor the animal that made Western life possible. It’s a hell of a meal.” — Buck S. (Eagle, ID)

204 W Main St | (406) 284-6929 | yelp.com

Tournedos Steakhouse, Rochester, NY

Dry-Aged Bone-In Ribeye Regular Cut: “This is a melt-in-your-mouth, easy-to-cut, must-be-ordered-rare steak. The restaurant an ambiance and wine list that compete with the best. Their sides are the second half of the meal: garlic-roasted brussels sprouts, Yukon Gold mashed potatoes with truffle butter, and, of course, the creamed spinach. It’s a meal so hearty that the leftovers will make your mouth water the next day.” — Chance W. (Big Horn, WY)

Inn On Broadway, 26 Broadway S | (585) 269-3888 | innonbroadway.com

Pine Club, Dayton, OH

Bone-In Ribeye: “This is an old-time steak house. Cash only, no reservations, and I’m pretty sure most of the waitstaff came with the building. Every surface is either wood or leather with half of the restaurant taken up by the bar. The steaks are thick, dry aged and cooked under flaming-hot broilers. There are other things on the menu; apparently the burger is pretty good. I wouldn’t know. All I can remember from any time I’ve gone is that the steak was the best I’ve ever had, and that after leaving, I was more of a man.” — Matt H. (Dayton, OH)

1926 Brown St | (937) 228-5371 | thepineclub.com
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The Eastwood Inn, Ligonier, PA

Filet Mignon: “What makes this steak so special is the atmosphere. Eastwood Inn was originally a speakeasy in the 1920s, serving booze to some of Pittsburgh’s most elite. The speakeasy feel is still embraced by having to ‘buzz in’ at the front door to enter. The filet mignon cuts are thick, and shipped in fresh from Pittsburgh’s finest meat markets. It’s served with a butter sauce.” — Jake H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

661 Old Lincoln Hwy | (724) 238-6454 | theeastwoodinn.com

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar, Providence, RI

New York Strip: “The steaks at Flemings are aged — tender, juicy and full of flavor. Though I’m partial to the ribeye, their New York Strip was better than any other ribeye I’ve had. It’s aged a minimum of 21 days, seasoned with salt and pepper, broiled, and finished with butter and fresh parsley. They also have a selection of classic rubs you can add, such as porcini mushroom, peppercorns, or Kona coffee. But in my opinion, the beauty of the natural flavors they bring out in their steak is all you need.” — Joe F. (Providence, RI)

1 W Exchange St | (401) 533-9000 | flemingssteakhouse.com

Second Bar + Kitchen, Austin, TX

Flank Steak with Chimichurri and Roasted Potatoes: “This flank steak is served rare and topped with fresh chimichurri sauce over a bed of roasted potatoes, seasoned with vinegar and the drippings from the steak. It must be eaten on the patio with a negroni while watching the crowds gather before an ACL Live concert at the Moody.” — Cliff M. (Austin, TX)

200 Congress Ave | (512) 827-2750 | secondbarkitchen.com

The Republic Steakhouse, College Station, TX

Bone-In Cowboy Ribeye: “The Republic gets it. The ambience here is old-school steakhouse: wood, dark colors, complete with low lights and white tablecloths. I order the 1.5-pound, Texas-raised, bone-in ribeye steak. It’s seasoned with salt and pepper, and then grilled on cast iron grates over a mesquite and oak-fueled fire. The fat cap gets a slight hint of smoke to it, while the interior is a majestic medium rare. It comes with the restaurant’s amazing quartet of sauces on the side: béarnaise, chimichurri, steak sauce and horseradish cream.” — Chris G. (Boerne, TX)

701 University Dr E #406 | (979) 260-4120 | therepublic1836.com

Keiichi, Denton, TX

Filet Mignon and Potatoes: “Having grown up in the country in Texas, I’m fairly partial to a perfectly grilled steak. It’s worth mentioning the Capital Grill, Knife Dallas, Bob’s Steak and Chop House, or Queenies — all great steakhouses. But I think when it comes down to it, I prefer the filet mignon at the extremely small Japanese restaurant Keiichi in Denton, Texas. Kei, the chef, works to create delicious meals right in front of his audience every night. His filet comes with truffled mash potatoes, green beans and an Asian-inspired side sauce for the steak.” — Will M. (Denton, TX)

500 N Elm St | (940) 230-3410 | yelp.com

Honorable Mention


Herman’s Ribhouse — Fayetteville, AR (Davis T.)
What to Order: Herman’s Cut Bone-In Ribeye

Mastro’s Steakhouse – Scottsdale, AZ (Varun S.)
What to Order: Bone-In Ribeye

Madera — Palo Alto, CA (Zakary K.)
What to Order: Oak-Grilled Dry-Aged Ribeye

LB Steak — San Jose, CA (Andrew F.)
What to Order: Bone-In Filet

Jill’s Place – Santa Barbara, CA (Cliff K.)
What to Order: Ribeye

Indian Creek Steakhouse — Caldwell, ID (Jeff W.)
What to Order: Eye of the Kobe Ribeye

Brick 29 Bistro — Nampa, ID (Shelley H.)
What to Order: Angus Ribeye Steak

Chicago Chop House — Chicago, IL (Pat C.)
What to Order: Long-Bone Tomahawk Mishima Ribeye

David Burke’s Primehouse — Chicago, IL (Kevin U.)
What to Order: 40-Day Dry-Aged Ribey

Gene & Georgetti Steakhouse — Chicago, IL (Pam B.)
What to Order: Broiled Bone-In Ribeye Steak

Doe’s Eat Place — Paducah, KY (Kegan M.)
What to Order: 2.5-Pound T-Bone

Burch Steak and Pizza Bar — Minneapolis, MN (Tae W.)
What to Order: Prime Beef Hanger

Babb Bar Cattle Baron Supper Club — Babb, MT (David R.)
What to Order: 28-Ounce Porterhouse

Merlino’s Family Steakhouse — North Conway, NH (Austin H.)
What to Order: Charbroiled T-Bone

Texas Club — Ruidoso, NM (Wil F.)
What to Order: Bone-In Ribeye

The Capital Grille — Cherry Hill, NJ (Chrissy L.)
What to Order: Ribeye

Arthur’s Tavern — Hoboken, NJ (Mark A.)
What to Order: 24-Ounce Delmonico Steak

Wayne Steakhouse — Wayne, NJ (Matthew N.)
What to Order: Steak for Two

American Cut — New York, NY (Robert F.)
What to Order: The New York City Cut

Craftsteak — Las Vegas, NV (Eric H.)
What to Order: Wagyu Strip Steak

Jamil’s Steakhouse — Oklahoma City, OK (Kyle C.)
What to Order: Governor’s Cut Porterhouse T-Bone

Plateau — Pendleton, OR (Kristy P.)
What to Order: Pendleton Whiskey Steak

Café Bruges — Carlisle, PA (Benjamin K.)
What to Order: Steak Frites

Pappas Bros. Steakhouse — Houston, TX (Sean B.)
What to Order: 40-Ounce Porterhouse for Two

Daniel’s Broiler — Seattle, WA (Nick J.)
What to Order: Daniel’s Delmonico 20-Ounce Bone-In New York

Image Credits: Nick Solares, therepublic1836.com, Amy Pezzicara, scholarsinn.com, tripadvisor.com, Archie’s Wayside, The Brooklyn Star.